+0
I was hoping that someone could assist me with the following grammer. I believe that it is correct to say " I want to take a bath" and that "I want to bath" is incorrect. If so can "I enjoy my bath" or do I have to "enjoy taking my bath"? If so can "I go to shower" or do I have to go to "bathe in my shower". Further do "I enjoy a book" or can I only "enjoy reading my book" and "enjoy my cake" or do I have to "enjoy eating my cake".
Id bath, shower and enjoy are all intransitive verbs why are they used differently. Can someone please explain the rules?

Alan
+0
Hi Alan,

Welcome aboard.

"I want to take a bath" FINE
"I want to bath" FINE IN THE UK, WHERE IT IS A VERB AS WELL AS A NOUN.
"I enjoy my bath" FINE
"I enjoy taking my bath" FINE
"I go to shower" FINE
"I go to bathe in my shower" FINE
"I enjoy a book" FINE
"I enjoy reading my book" FINE
"I enjoy my cake" FINE
"I enjoy eating my cake" FINE.

You can enjoy the event, the item or the process, Alan. It seems to me that your only confusion is with the verb, which is 'bathe' in the US and 'bath' in the UK. 'Bath' is of course a noun in both places.
Comments  
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Mister Micawber,

As a resident of the UK (and for many years, a resident of Bath!) I don't doubt that it may well be technically acceptable to express that you "want to bath" as opposed to "wanting to bathe". On an entirely unrelated note, in the city of York, it is technically acceptable (or at least perfectly legal) to shoot a Scotsman with a bow and arrow (except on Sundays)*.

My point? The English language - like its law system - is complex and difficult to maintain. Whilst there can be no doubt certain obscure structures exist, some of them are so old-fashioned/sporadic that their use only acts to confuse speakers of modern English.

Many thanks,

Mark

*this is no joke!
Mister Micawber,

Whilst it is indeed technically permissable "to bath", it is also technically permissable, in the city of York: 'for an Englishman to shoot a Scotsman with a bow and arrow on any day except Sunday'.

My point? The English language - much like it's legal system - is complex and difficult to maintain, and whilst some of the more old-fashioned structures might well be acceptable, that in itself doesn't mean that they are practised!Emotion: smile

(apologies for the repeat-post if there is one)

Mrak