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I got confused. Last few days, I saw a book describing about these two words.

I followed the British English actually. The book says,

Bath =as a verb

(a) you bath when you wash yourself in a bath and you bath someone when you wash them in a bath.

(b) It isnot used in this sense in American English. They use "bathe" as a verb

By the way, If I consult any dictionaries, they mention about "bath" as an old-fashon word in British English. Nowadays, we have to use "bathe" as a verb.

Any Native speaker, who speak British Engilsh, could give me any comments?
I would like to confirm this statement.

Thanks!!
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That's strange. We used to 'bathe' but now we 'bath'.
That's strange. We used to 'bathe' but now we 'bath'.
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But, If I check the dictionaries, they all write "bathe" for British English. Can you check for it? Thanks!!
When you bath, you have a bath. (BRIT; in AM, use bathe)
The three children all bath in the same bath water.
= bathe

If you bath someone, especially a child, you wash them in a bath. (BRIT)
Don't feel you have to bath your child every day.
= bathe (AM)

(Collins Cobuild Dictionary)
But, I check the "Longman" and "oxford" and "Cambridge" dictionries, they show me that the "bathe" is used as a verb in British English. "bath" is an old-fashion verb. Have you noticed?
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Vincent TeoAny Native speaker, who speak British Engilsh, could give me any comments?
I would like to confirm this statement.
I can't speak for the Brits but I would be surprised if their usage is substantially different from AmE usage.
v., bathe, bathed, bath·ing, bathes
n., bath, baths

http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?s=bathe&gwp=13
http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?s=bath&gwp=13
Oxford says 'baths' (noun) (BrE) is old-fashioned and means a public building where you can go and swim.

Longman: 'bath' (old-fashioned) to wash yourself in a bath; = bathe (AmE). It is more usual to say have a bath (BrE) or take a bath (AmE).

Only Cambridge says 'bath' as a verb for 'bathe' (AmE) is old-fashioned.
RayH
Vincent Teo
Any Native speaker, who speak British Engilsh, could give me any comments?

I would like to confirm this statement.

I can't speak for the Brits but I would be surprised if their usage is substantially different from AmE usage.

v., bathe, bathed, bath·ing, bathes

n., bath, baths

http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?s=bathe&gwp=13

http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?s=bath&gwp=13

I completely agree with everything RayH said.

She is taking a bath. Bath - is a noun.

I love to bathe in the tropical sun of Hawaii. Bathe -is a verb.

Don't be confused by : bathing, where the "e" is revomed when the verb "bathe" is used as gerund. i.e. Elephants love bathing in the mud.

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