I'm watching my excellent Columbia movie serial on TWO DVDs chapter by chapter on Saturday mornings recreating, in part, my boyhood visits to the Esso Cinema, Holbury, where, at the age of 9, I first encountered Robert Lowery and John Duncan as these masked marvels.
Last week's Chapter 11, 'Batman's Last Chance!', finished with the narrator telling the audience...
Don't miss 'Robin's Roose (Ruse)' - Chapter 12 of Batman and Robin at this theatre next week!
We say 'rooze' in England - 'roose' sounds comical to English ears, but, possibly, not all Americans pronounce it thataway! :-D

Nick from England
1 2
I'm watching my excellent Columbia movie serial on TWO DVDs chapter by chapter on Saturday mornings recreating, in part, my ... say 'rooze' in England - 'roose' sounds comical to English ears, but, possibly, not all Americans pronounce it thataway! :-D

"Roose"? I must be living in a cave. I've never hear "ruse" pronounced that way.

Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
I'm watching my excellent Columbia movie serial on TWO DVDs ... ears, but, possibly, not all Americans pronounce it thataway! :-D

"Roose"? =A0I must be living in a cave. =A0I've never hear "ruse" pronounced that way.

LOL - thanks, Tony - perhaps it's 1949 speak!
Nick from England
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
[nq:2]I'm watching my excellent Columbia movie serial on TWO DVDs ... ears, but, possibly, not all Americans pronounce it thataway! :-D
"Roose"? I must be living in a cave. I've never hear "ruse" pronounced that way.

I have, often. Well, as often as one ever hears the word spoken, which is rather infrequently (despite all the parallel forms).

Cordially,
Eric Walker, Owlcroft House
"Roose"? I must be living in a cave. I've never hear "ruse" pronounced that way.

LOL - thanks, Tony - perhaps it's 1949 speak!

There's an American pronunciation at

My ears are a bit blocked - I'm not sure which way they've gone but I think it's the 'z'

John Dean
Oxford
LOL - thanks, Tony - perhaps it's 1949 speak!

There's an American pronunciation at http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ruse My ears are a bit blocked - I'm not sure which way they've gone but I think it's the 'z'

I'm hearing it as "ss" rather than "z". Just in case the speakers on this laptop are introducing sibilance I listened to "loose" and "lose" from the same dictionary. The former is "ss" and the latter is clearly "z".
http://www.merriam-webster.com/cgi-bin/audio.pl?loose001=loose http://www.merriam-webster.com/cgi-bin/audio.pl?lose0001=lose

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
[nq:1]I have (heard it that way), often. Well, as often as one ever hears the word spoken, which is rather infrequently (despite all the parallel forms).
To add: someone unsure of the pronunciation might think of fuse or amuse, but far more likely is that they will think of use, and both being noun senses will hear "yoos" and so think "roos".

Cordially,
Eric Walker, Owlcroft House
To add: someone unsure of the pronunciation might think of fuse or amuse, but far more likely is that they will think of use

More likely still in the context of Gotham City is a regional American accent with German or Dutch influence. I hear "roose" from people from the New York City area, rural Pennsylvania, and the Upper Midwest.

¬R
[nq:2]To add: someone unsure of the pronunciation might think of fuse or amuse, but far more likely is that they will think of use
More likely still in the context of Gotham City is a regional American accent with German or Dutch influence. I hear "roose" from people from the New York City area, rural Pennsylvania, and the Upper Midwest.

I know it is supposed to have the "z" sound, but my speech defect turns it to an "s" sound. But I agree that in some parts of my state, the "s" sound is the more common, at least in this word and a few others.

Pat Durkin
Wisconsin
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