New BBC Spelling Test
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4059953.stm
quote
Author Vivian Cook, whose book, Accomodating Brocolli in the Cemetary, looks at many common mistakes in spelling, points out that six out of 10 15-year-olds cannot write 10 lines without making an error, while there are words which adults struggle with all their lives.

unquote
"six out of 10" - would it not be better to be consistent?

ie '6 out of 10' or 'six out of ten'
My feeling is that the quoted text is clumsy and not as simple to understand as it could be. In an article on written English surely more care should be taken.
regards
Matthew Newell
(who slipped-up on Q.8 and Q.10 by clicking too quickly )
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Matthew Newell wrote on 03 Dec 2004:
New BBC Spelling Test http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4059953.stm quote Author Vivian Cook, whose book, Accomodating Brocolli in the Cemetary, looks at many common ... as simple to understand as it could be. In an article on written English surely more care should be taken.

There are plenty of style manuals that require numbers under 10 (except those in measure of time, distance, weight, or volume) to be spelt out. Some require numbers under 100 to be spelt out. They also require that their style decisions be consistently adhered to. It's a choice.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
New BBC Spelling Test http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4059953.stm quote Author Vivian Cook, whose book, Accomodating Brocolli in the Cemetary, looks at many common ... 10" - would it not be better to be consistent? ie '6 out of 10' or 'six out of ten'

I agree. Some style sheets insist that all numbers from one to nine should be written out, while 10 and upwards should be figures. Decent style sheets, however, say that numbers in ranges or close proximity should all be of the same type, i.e. avoid things like "children aged between five and 11" or "eight-bit and 16-bit processing". I'm surprised the BBC style sheet (if indeed they have one perhaps they don't; they're relative newcomers to the written media) appears not to stipulate this.
My feeling is that the quoted text is clumsy and not as simple to understand as it could be. In an article on written English surely more care should be taken.

Again, I agree. The comma after "book" is Dead Wrong (unless, that is, Vivian Cook has only written one book and doesn't intend to write any more) and the commas after "Cook" and "error" would be better as dashes, to delimit the parenthesis more clearly.

Ross Howard
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Matthew Newell wrote on 03 Dec 2004:

New BBC Spelling Test http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4059953.stm quote Author Vivian Cook, whose ... article on written English surely more care should be taken.

There are plenty of style manuals that require numbers under 10 (except those in measure of time, distance, weight, or ... under 100 to be spelt out. They also require that their style decisions be consistently adhered to. It's a choice.

That is often the rule, but what kind of lunkhead would apply it so literally in this case?
Surely you meant to say "Cook" and "spelling"?
Surely you meant to say "Cook" and "spelling"?

You're surely right. Sorry.

Ross Howard
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New BBC Spelling Test http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4059953.stm quote Author Vivian Cook, whose ... ie '6 out of 10' or 'six out of ten'

I agree. Some style sheets insist that all numbers from one to nine should be written out, while 10 and ... indeed they have one perhaps they don't; they're relative newcomers to the written media) appears not to stipulate this.

This logic also applies to units. Saying some thing like, "from 500Hz to 1KHz" can be confusing where "from 500- to 1000Hz" is clearer.

dg (domain=ccwebster)
This logic also applies to units. Saying some thing like, "from 500Hz to 1KHz" can be confusing where "from 500- to 1000Hz" is clearer.

And yet I don't think the same rule would apply to bytes. "500KB to 1000KB" looks odd to me, and only gets one hit on Google, whereas "500KB to 1 MB" gets 133 hits. Are most EE's familiar with the notation you used for hertzes?
Jess Askin wrote on 03 Dec 2004:
Matthew Newell wrote on 03 Dec 2004: There are plenty ... their style decisions be consistently adhered to. It's a choice.

That is often the rule, but what kind of lunkhead would apply it so literally in this case?[/nq]A copy editor, a newspaper reporter, or anyone else whose writing has to be done according to a particular set of style-manual rules. It's like when my father was driving home at 3:30 a.m. in San Fernando Valley 35 years ago and caught a red light just after getting off the Ventura Freeway. He looked left and right and forward and backward, saw no cars anywhere, and made a left turn against that traffic light. A second later, he was stopped by a CHP officer and given a traffic ticket for running a red light.

The cop asked my father if he hadn't seen the light. My father said, "Sure I saw the light, but what kind of lunkhead obeys traffic lights at 3:30 a.m. when there are no other cars on the road?" The cop replied, "Lunkheads who don't want to get $50 traffic tickets and two points for a moving violation, smart guy."

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
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