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The bond of key-relationship, though no longer so abvious as once it was, is yet discovered by a musician; the bond of sympathy is more elusive, and presents itself for recognition to the imagination and the feelings of the listener. Nevertheless, it is an element in every truly great symphony, and I have already indicated how it may sometimes become patent to the ear alone, so it be intelligently employed, and enjoy the co-operation of memory.

Qusetion#1
How do you paraphrase '...
presents itself for recognition to the imagination and the feelings of the listener ?

Question#2
About '
so it be intelligently employed ', why 'be', the bare form? Is it some sort of ellipsis? Could I put 'should' in front of it?

Question#3
How do you paraphrase '
enjoy the co-operation of memory '?

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Comments  
Before I consider tackling this one myself, Taka, can you say what is referred to by key-relationship? (Does it mean, for instance, the relationship of the notes and chords to a given key, like B-flat?) Is this statement, perhaps, from an article on a particular genre of contemporary music?
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Consideration no.1--

Before attempting paraphrases, I have to say that, for me, a bond of sympathy 'patent to the ear alone' is the most questionable (conceptually) of all the phrases here, since the ear alone has no imagination, feeling, intelligence or memory, all of which seem essential in the experience of sympathy.
presents itself for recognition to the imagination and the feelings of the listener:

A sympathetic connection to music requires in the listener an ability to conjure up images and associations that allow for the recognition of qualities capable of stirring up emotions.

so it be intelligently employed: so [that] it [can] be intelligently employed.

enjoy the co-operation of memory:

One cannot recognize anything without memory, since to recognize mean 'to know again'; and one cannot be intelligent about sensations (the sounds of the music) without processing those sounds through the brain's memory center. Therefore, sympathy cannot occur on the sole basis of the operations in the ear, it needs the co-operation of the faculty of memory.

(These may be interpretations more than paraphrases.)

In retrospect, though, I don't quite know how one can say that sympathy, or the bond of sympathy, is an element in great music. Sympathy seems to be an element in relations, not in things.
Davkettpresents itself for recognition to the imagination and the feelings of the listener:

A sympathetic connection to music requires in the listener an ability to conjure up images and associations that allow for the recognition of qualities capable of stirring up emotions.

Uh...I think that's a bit hard for my student to understand. Could you please make it a bit easier?

Davkettso it be intelligently employed: so [that] it [can] be intelligently employed.


Is this kind of ellipsis quite common?

Davkett enjoy the co-operation of memory:
One cannot recognize anything without memory, since to recognize mean 'to know again'; and one cannot be intelligent about sensations (the sounds of the music) without processing those sounds through the brain's memory center. Therefore, sympathy cannot occur on the sole basis of the operations in the ear, it needs the co-operation of the faculty of memory.


Great. Just as I thought. Thank you.

Davkett
(These may be interpretations more than paraphrases.)

In retrospect, though, I don't quite know how one can say that sympathy, or the bond of sympathy, is an element in great music. Sympathy seems to be an element in relations, not in things.
Oops! Sorry. I edited it in a bad way. It was originally 'the spiritual bond'.

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Question#2
About 'so it be intelligently employed ', why 'be', the bare form? Is it some sort of ellipsis? Could I put 'should' in front of it?


Dear friends,

It is a most interesting question. It is perhaps a subjunctive? Emotion: smile

We may then perhaps say «so long as it is intelligently employed and enjoys the cooperation of memory».

Kind regards, Emotion: smile

Goldmund
Goldmund
«so long as it is intelligently employed and enjoys the cooperation of memory».

Hi Goldmund,

Do you notice, however, that 'so long as it ' only works with enjoys, not enjoy?
GoldmundIt is a most interesting question. It is perhaps a subjunctive? Emotion: smile

We may then perhaps say «so long as it is intelligently employed and enjoys the cooperation of memory».

Kind regards, Emotion: smile

Goldmund

Excuse me, but isn't 'enjoy' the verb for the subject 'it' (i.e it may sometimes become ... and enjoy...)?
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