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past 1st & 3d singular was 2d singular were plural were past subjunctive were past participle been present participle being present 1st singular am 2d singular are 3d singular is plural are present subjunctive be

There are many 'derivative' forms of "be". The choice of the tense and the grammatical person, being singular or plural, affects the 'derivative' form to be used.

Is there any 'pure' form of "be" where it is used on its own? It is a kind of word which is very much present everywhere but doesn't really have its own face.
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(imperative) Be well.
Thanks, Avangi.

Is it in present tense?
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Yes sir!

Happy New Year! Be well in 2011!Emotion: happy

I suppose some would say it refers to future time. (Maybe 2012!)

Don't drink and drive!(Is that present tense?) Emotion: thinking I think it's habitual behavior.

Stop tapping your foot! Present tense, I hope.

I've never seen a discussion about whether imperatives refer to future time.

Let's go to the movies!
It lives with the subjunctive: I suggest you be on time. She demanded he be quiet.
Grammar GeekIt lives with the subjunctive
I like the way you put that. Emotion: nodding
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AvangiYes sir! Happy New Year! Be well in 2011!I suppose some would say it refers to future time. (Yes, I would say this. Because it's a kind of desire, prayer or wish, hence subjunctive, IMHO) (Maybe 2012!)Don't drink and drive! (Is that present tense?) (To me, it's an order.) I think it's habitual behavior. (I don't know if it's habitual, what suggests that it's habitual behavior). But it's an order or advice that's what I can tell.)Stop tapping your foot! Present tense, I hope. (Yes, an order, too)I've never seen a discussion about whether imperatives refer to future time.Let's go to the movies! (Yes, that's good point. A subjunctive form doesn't include imperatives, does it? Do imperatives refer to future time? I don't think so as far as an imperative in context of an order (an imperative could also be a request) is concerned. When one issues an order, one is asking someone to resist from doing something.
Thank you, Avangi, GG.

Avangi, my comments are in blue along with the quoted materia. Please note that the comments are only there to tell you what I think so that you could guide me properly. And sometimes I include points in my posts which are quite obvious such as the one above "an imperative could also be a request". Such points are only for my own personal reference so that they could be helpful in the future. Thanks.
I too have more questions than answers regarding the relation between imperative, subjunctive, present, future, and habituation.

"Be careful!" (now, or future?)

"He [usually] goes to bed at midnight." (present tense - habituation)

"I don't drink and drive." (habituation)

"I will not drink and drive." (present habituation, or future promise?)
I think using "be" as an infinitive gives it an opportunity to present itself in its true form - well, at least to some extent. e.g. To be on time is one of best things about him. What is your thinking on this? Please let me know.
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