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So this is not the first time that I have to argue with my English teacher about my mark. Here is my current problem.
"I would like to play tennis tomorrow if the weather (be) nice."
I was given this sentence with no other context and had to use the right for of "be".
I really am not sure if I was right but I know she is wrong sometimes, even after years of experience. I would like to get some answers as soon as possible because she might rate my work any time. Thank you.
Comments  
What answer did you put?
I put
"I would like to play tennis tomorrow if the weather is nice."
and my teacher corrected it to
"I would like to play tennis tomorrow if the weather were nice."

I talked to many people about this, some say that only "is" fits, and some say that basically both are correct. To to prove it to my teacher I have to print some very specific grammar rules or else she will just ask me not to waste her time as always.
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Anonymous"I would like to play tennis tomorrow if the weather (be) nice."
If I were absolutely required to use the subjunctive, I'd leave it like it is. "If the weather be nice." That's what my grandfather used to say.

I could see using "were" in a present tense situation. "I'd be playing tennis right now if the weather were nice," but I've never heard it used for a future situation.

"I would like to play tennis tommorow if the weather should be nice" is quite common in this situation. "Is" is surely most common. "if the weather should happen to be nice" is another common expression, suggesting it might not be.
Hi,
I'd accept either.

"I would like to play tennis tomorrow if the weather were nice." I might say this in February with 2 metres of snow on the ground. In other words, there is no chance of playing tennis tomorrow. It's a hypothetical, 'unreal' remark.

"I would like to play tennis tomorrow if the weather is nice." I might say this in May on a warm day when there is just a little bit of rain. In other words, there is an excellent possibility of playing tennis tomorrow. It's a 'real condition' remark.

Best wishes, Clive
Hi, and welcome to the forums. I feel your frustration, but try to have patience with your teacher - she's doing the best she can, I"m sure.

You have a "first conditional" in your sentence -- what is said is still possible, and the time refers to the future. You use the present "is."

Look up "first conditional" in Google for a number of sites that will augment your argument.
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Clive "I would like to play tennis tomorrow if the weather were nice." I might say this in February with 2 metres of snow on the ground. In other words, there is no chance of playing tennis tomorrow. It's a hypothetical, 'unreal' remark.
Hi Clive, I've read this several times, and it finally dawned on me that you might mean "If the weather were nice right now," or "if the weather were nice these days" - that is, if the seasonal weather were nice, which it's not. Is this the case, or do you mean, "I'd like to play if it were nice tomorrow"?

Best regards, - A.

Edit. I guess I could have answered my own question if I had picked up on the two metres of snow - unless indoors.
Hi,
I was thinking '. . . if the weather were nice tomorrow'.

Clive