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I don't understand why "be going" is used in these sentences below.

Please teach me about the usage of "be going".

ex: " I ought to / must be going now."

"Let's be going."

"We'd better be going."

" Will you be going somewhere?"
Comments  
All work with just "go."
This use of continuous (be going) is showing perhaps more implication and immediacy in informal talk.
momento I ought to / must be going now."

"Let's be going."

"We'd better be going."
In these sentences, be going has the same sense as leave:
[I / We] [ought to / must / should / have to / had better] [leave / go / be going] now.
be going is a little different from go because it focuses on just starting to go, on just beginning to get the feeling that it is time to leave.
momento" Will you be going somewhere?"
This is a little different. It is not very idiomatic with "somewhere". Let's try:
Will you be going to Perugia when you visit Italy?
This means: Will there be a time during your visit to Italy when, if I were there to observe you, I would see you in the act of traveling to the city of Perugia?
CJ
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Thank you very much for your answer. I understand it. Emotion: smile
Thank you so much to explain the use of "be going" .

May I ask you about the second example sentence to make sure my understanding ?



" Will you be going somewhere?"

This is a little different. It is not very idiomatic with "somewhere". Let's try:

Will you be going to Perugia when you visit Italy?

This means: Will there be a time during your visit to Italy when, if I were there to observe you, I would see you in the act of traveling to the city of Perugia?

Does this question include the speaker's wish to visit Perugia instead of the questioner if the lister have chance to go?

Is there any meaning difference between "Will you be going to ...? " and "Are you going to ...?" in this case ?
>Does this question include the speaker's wish to visit Perugia instead of the questioner if the lister have chance to go?
I don't see that.
>difference between "Will you be going to ...? " and "Are you going to ...?
The first is plain future, the 2nd is asking if there's some planning about it.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thank you very much again for giving me the answer.