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After the lession , I am going to coffee shop. In, the coffee shop I am going to have a coffee cup . My friend is going to have a glass of water . I am going to spend 5$ for a cup of coffee and a glass of water.

  1. What time will they be here?


They’ll be here by 8.00

  1. When are you leave here?


We’re leaving tomorrow.

  1. What is he going to study at university?


He is going to study History.

  1. How long will you be there?


I’ll be away for three days.

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Comments  (Page 2) 
I think " when are you leaving " , It mean in the future , what day you leave and the day for leaving was in diary .
Not necessarily. It could be for a current event. I could be at a party and ask another guest 'When are you leaving?' - meaning when are you leaving the party.
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Nona The BritNot necessarily. It could be for a current event. I could be at a party and ask another guest 'When are you leaving?' - meaning when are you leaving the party.
I think in this stuation is a decision at the moment , we should use " when will you leave?"
That doesn't sound natural to me. It sounds as though you are telling them you wish they would go away!
Using present progressive to indicate future action is very common in English. This may present some confusion to learners. “I am going to try to make it to your party”. This means from this minute to the whole time your party shall last, I’ll make an effort to show up.

I am leaving for a week from now. Even the construction is present progressive, the tense is really in the future.

What time are you leaving your house for Todd’s wedding tomorrow? Leaving your house …requires no “from” in this context.
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Hi guys,

The use of Present Continuous in statements about the future like I am leaving for Paris a week from now commonly suggests at all the detailed arrangements have already been made. eg My plane ticket is sitting on my desk, I have made my hotel reservation, I have asked my neighbour to feed my cat, etc.

Best wishes, Clive
Hi Clive,

The example was used to illustrate the suggestive contrast of present which is "I am leaving..." and "a week from now". Everything you suggested is true.

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