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I thought (it) over and over again but could not decide whether I should avenge the insult he (had) inflicted on me last night. I called up my friend and asked for his advice. He listened to me carefully and said in his usual soft voice "Abil, be patient. Your Chitta (mind) will never clam down if you give way to your anger. As you know, an unsettled Chitta can do much more harm to you than your enemy".

Is there any mistake? Can I omit the bracketed "it" and "had"? Thanks
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AbilI thought about it over and over again but could not decide whether I should avenge the insult he (had) inflicted on me last night. I called up my friend and asked for his advice. He listened to me carefully and said in his usual soft voice "Abil, be patient. Your Chitta (mind) will never calm down if you give way to your anger. As you know, an unsettled Chitta can do much more harm to you than (to) your enemy".
Looks good. You can omit the "had" if you want to. I put an optional "to" in as well.
Comments  
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Thanks Vorpar a thousand times.

I do not know what meaning it ultimately assumed, but I intended to mean that both an unsettled Chitta and an enemy can do harm to me; but the former can cause more harm than the latter. That is why I think your addtional "to" is misplaced.
AbilI do not know what meaning it ultimately assumed, but I intended to mean that both an unsettled Chitta and an enemy can do harm to me; but the former can cause more harm than the latter. That is why I think your addtional "to" is misplaced.
You are right.
Thanks 26TMNTJG2PG.
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