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I think I might have come across this expression used in the context below:

Are the rights to X PRODUCT with you? (Meaning do you hold / represent the rights to this product)


Thank you.

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anonymous

Is the expression used correctly in the sentence above? Does it have the meaning in the brackets?

Are the rights to X PRODUCT with you?

I've never heard or seen this phrasing with the intended meaning in brackets.

CJ

Comments  

Oops, I've forgotten to ask the question! Emotion: stick out tongue

Is the expression used correctly in the sentence above? Does it have the meaning in the brackets?


Thank you.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
What about 'lie with'?
anonymous What about 'lie with'?

That would have to be phrased as

Do the rights to X PRODUCT lie with you?

No, I've never heard or seen this either. It sounds extremely formal. I doubt it would be used very often, if at all.

CJ

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CalifJimAre the rights to X PRODUCT with you?I've never heard or seen this phrasing with the intended meaning in brackets.CJ

Agreed. It would be more natural to ask someone if they have or own the rights to something.