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The hen used her beak/bill to pick up the corn off the ground.

Which fits here better, beak or bill?

Second, could I use 'from" to replace "off" without changing its meaning?

Thanks.
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AngliholicThe hen used her beak/bill to pick up the corn off the ground.

Which fits here better, beak or bill? (I think both are fine.)

Second, could I use 'from" to replace "off" without changing its meaning? (You could.)
I prefer "beak" because the sound of it resembles the aspect of the real beak/bill...

In Russian it is "klyuv", which also sounds just like the beak looks.
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Hi,

The hen used her beak/bill to pick up the corn off the ground.

Which fits here better, beak or bill?

The word 'bill' is used only for certain types of birds, particularly water birds, with certain types of beaks.

A hen is always said to have a 'beak'.

Generally in everyday speech, the word 'beak' is used for all birds. I never speak of a 'bill'.

Second, could I use 'from" to replace "off" without changing its meaning? 'From' sounds better to me than 'off', but in practice I'd just say The hen used her beak to pick up the corn.

Finally, I'd much more naturally say 'it' rather than 'she' for a hen, and in fact for all birds and animals that are not my pets.

Best wishes, Clive
Thanks, my helpful friends.

I get it now.
CliveFinally, I'd much more naturally say 'it' rather than 'she' for a hen, and in fact for all birds and animals that are not my pets.
That's interesting, I didn't know...

By the way...
Ant_222I prefer "beak" because the sound of it resembles the aspect of the real beak/bill... In Russian it is "klyuv", which also sounds just like the beak looks.
how can something sound like it looks? LOL, I know LSD makes it possible, but usually you can't "hear" an image... Emotion: smile
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Koyeen «how can something sound like it looks? LOL, I know LSD makes it possible, but usually you can't "hear" an image...»

Yeah, I don't know. When I was 5 or six I clearly knew that "tuesday" was light brown, "friday" light blue, "monday" grey/transparent, "Wednesday" had the color of those autumn leaves which are light yellow, like painted in water-colour, "Thursday" was more yellow, with a tint of brown or orange. "friday" was light blue. Well, not the names of days, but the days themselves had these colors in my perception.

Now I almost don't feel them, only a weak reminiscence of these sensations doesn't let me forget the colors. Yes, I remember my sensations not the colors!

As to words, yeah there very characteristic words.
"Yozh" [jo:3] — hedgehog.
"Klin" [klin] — wedge
...

And I don't hear an image, as you suggested. I hear the thing itself.
bill is the hard pointed or curved outer part of a bird's mouth (Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary)

Is it a case of British vs American English?
No, in the UK we tend to use 'beak' too. I'd probably say 'bill' for a duck or a goose, though.
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