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We are prisoners of the sense we have about the world because of our size, and rarely recognize how different the world must appear to small animals.

About 'because of our size', is it:

(1) We are prisoners of the sense because of our size
or
(2) We have (the sense) about the world because of our size

?

I think it's (1), but my book says it's (2)...
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We are prisoners of the sense we have about the world because of our size, and rarely recognize how different the world must appear to small animals.

We are prisoners of the sense we have about the world=
We are prisoners of our prejudices (preconceived judgements) with regard the world=
We are prisoners of our ideas about the world
Marius HancuWe are prisoners of the sense we have about the world because of our size, and rarely recognize how different the world must appear to small animals.

We are prisoners of the sense we have about the world=
We are prisoners of our prejudices (preconceived judgements) with regard the world=
We are prisoners of our ideas about the world
That's not what I'm asking. My question is, which part of the sentence does 'because of...' refer to?

(Plus, as aforementioned, where are you from, MH? And what's the reason for hiding your nationality? Emotion: smile)
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because of our size
refers to everything in front of it
thus you must understand what's going on in there.

We think this way about the world because we have this size.
Marius Hancubecause of our size
refers to everything in front of it
thus you must understand what's going on in there.

We think this way about the world because we have this size.
Everything. Well, yes. Broadly speaking, it is.

But if you are supposed to pin down the part, which part of the sentence do you think it refers to? That's my question.

(And you keep ignoring the other question...)
The sense/view we have (of the world) is because of our size.
The sense/view we have (of the world) is heavily influenced by our size.

This is the core idea, like in Gulliver's Travels, perhaps.

Then you can add being prisoners of that view.
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Marius HancuThe sense/view we have (of the world) is because of our size.
The sense/view we have (of the world) is heavily influenced by our size.

This is the core idea, like in Gulliver's Travels, perhaps.

Then you can add being prisoners of that view.

Hmm...so you think it's (2).

But isn't it also possible that the reason why we are the prisoners of the sense we have is that, compared to small animals, our size is big, which makes our bodies much easier to be influenced by gravity (i.e. Because of our size, we are prisoners of the sense we have about the world)?

(OK. You don't want to show your nationality. So be it... I was just wondering where my teacher was from, and I thought my question was quite legitimate. I think you should be proud of your nationality, no matter what it is...)
Hi Taka,

The statement seems odd to me, perhaps more conceptually than grammatically. All creatures of any size are going to have a sense of the world that is determined in part, but only in part, by their size. (The pull of gravity, by the way, relates to weight not size.) I don't believe the author is suggesting that a large size is more of a prison than a small size. The prison is really the limits of an organism's perceptual apparatus.

There's really no semantic option here but to read the structure as (2): we have our sense of the world because of our size.
davkett,
Davkett All creatures of any size are going to have a sense of the world that is determined in part, but only in part, by their size. (The pull of gravity, by the way, relates to weight not size.) I don't believe the author is suggesting that a large size is more of a prison than a small size.
For your information, this is how the origninal text goes.

We are prisoners of the sense we have about the world because of our size, and rarely recognize how different the world must appear to small animals. Since our relative surface area is so small at our large size, we are ruled by the forces of gravity acting upon our weight. But gravity means next to nothing to very small animals with high surface-to-vulume ratios: they live in a world of surface forces and judge the pleasures and dangers of their surroundings in ways foreign to our experience.

To me, things seem quite opposite to what you say, davkett.
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