+0
Hi all! Emotion: smile

"Because I didn't see him, I couldn't talk to him." Is it a mistake to use "because" in this way at the beginning of a sentence? (="I couldn't talk to him, because I didn't see him.") Is it better to say, for example: "SINCE I didn't see him, I couldn't talk to him."

Thanks in advance.
+0
Hi Fajrereto, and welcome to the forums.

It is perfectly fine to start your sentence as you have in your example.

Sentences in formal writing shouldn't begin with subordinating conjunctions (although, because, before, since, etc.) unless they have the independent clause afterwards, as your does.

Here are some examples of how you should NOT start a "sentence" (because they are not full sentences at all) in formal writing:

Why did the chicken cross the road?
* Because he wanted to get to the other side.
(Correct version is either "The chicken crossed the road because he wanted to get to the other side," or "Because he wanted to get to the other side, the chicken crossed the road.")

I really don't like peas. *Although I do like them when I grow them in my own garden.
(Correct version: I really don't like peas, although I do like them when I grow them in my own garden.)

Note this second example is used frequently in informal writing.

Does that answer your question?
+0
FajreretoHi all! Emotion: smile

"Because I didn't see him, I couldn't talk to him." Is it a mistake to use "because" in this way at the beginning of a sentence? (="I couldn't talk to him, because I didn't see him.") Is it better to say, for example: "SINCE I didn't see him, I couldn't talk to him."

Thanks in advance.

Use the comma after the clause with 'because', but not before.

Because he was late, he didn't get any food ~ He didn't get any food because he was late.

This is really a convention rather than a rule, but many writers follow it.