+0
Dear members,

According to Kaplan (GMAT tutor) the following sentence is correct in GMAT land . Kaplan has not
given an explanation for how "if only because" makes sense in this statement.

Proponents of the equal rights amendments argue for its necessity if only because averge salaries for women are still considerably lower than those for men with comparable jobs and work experience.

I would appreciate your comments.

Thanks,
Sharad.
1 2
Comments  (Page 2) 
If (asked about the reason, I'd say it's) only because...Emotion: big smile
If at all, only because...

Doesn't it work, too?
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hi,

If at all, only because...

Doesn't it work, too?


This is OK, although it sounds like it introduces one of those sentence fragments that we often use in speech. Can you find a way to use it in a complete sentence?

Best wishes, Clive
Thank you guys! I am reparing GMAT too. Thank you for the help!
"If only because" = even if there is no better reason than
The saying serves to either make light of the reason given, or add special importance to it.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I think so.
They argue for its necessity if only because average salaries for women are still considerably lower
They argue for its necessity, if there is only a reason, because average salaries for women are still considerably lower
The expression If only because is functioning as a subordinating conjunction in a dependent clause. The usage sounds awkward; however, it is correct.

Best wishes,

Sally