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Dear members,

According to Kaplan (GMAT tutor) the following sentence is correct in GMAT land . Kaplan has not
given an explanation for how "if only because" makes sense in this statement.

Proponents of the equal rights amendments argue for its necessity if only because averge salaries for women are still considerably lower than those for men with comparable jobs and work experience.

I would appreciate your comments.

Thanks,
Sharad.
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Comments  
"if only because" is correct, yes.

Proponents of the equal rights amendments argue for its necessity and perhaps they do so for the sole reason that average salaries for women are still considerably lower than those for men with comparable jobs and work experience.
Hi Jim,

Thanks.

I somehow feel that IF and BECAUSE can't go togethor. Here, IF means 'on the condition'. So why do we need 'because' ? Usage of 'because' means 'for the reason' and reason being already true.

I still did not understand the usage of "if only because". However, I do understand your translated sentence. Little more explanation and few examples will help.

Also, let me know whether "if only because" is an idiom ??

thanks,
Sharad
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Yes. "if only because" is purely idiomatic.

I clean the kitchen floor because it's dirty. = I do the cleaning for this reason: The floor is dirty at that time.

I clean the kitchen floor only because it's dirty. = I do the cleaning for this reason, and only this reason; I don't do it for any other reason: The floor is dirty at that time.

I clean the kitchen floor once a month if only because I've gotten into the habit. = I do the cleaning for no really good reason. I do not do the cleaning because the floor is necessarilydirty, for example. Maybe IF I do the cleaning, the real reason is ONLY/simply/just BECAUSE I'm in the habit of doing so, whether the floor is dirty or not.
Jim,
I am bothering you one more time.

I clean the kitchen floor once a month if only because I've gotten into the habit.

Does this mean :

If I clean the kitchen floor once a month, it would be only because I've gotten into the habit.

??

thanks,
Sharad.
Yes. It does mean that.
However, there is just one more slight nuance of meaning in "if only because" which I feel your "translation" does not capture.

I clean the kitchen floor once a month for no better reason than that I've gotten into the habit.

The sentence just above seems to capture the meaning just a slight bit better, to my ear.

_______

Another related idiomatic pattern with "if" is as follows:

If I clean the floor, it's because I'm obsessive.

We could almost call this "non-conditional if", because it really is just a fancier way of saying "I clean the floor because I'm obsessive." It certainly doesn't mean "If I clean the floor, I'm obsessive" nor "If I'm obsessive, I clean the floor."
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Thanks a lot. Now I do get the usage of "if only because".
Now you understand the usage if only because you have discussed it and thought about it for a while!

Emotion: smile
Maybe we can think of 'if only because' as an abbreviation of this: 'if no particular reason for that, then just because...', can't we?
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