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Could you please check if the following sentences are grammatically correct and if they sound right?

Due to the fact that/Because he had lost his notes, he decided to present using the information from the internet.

Prior to the presentation he had lost his notes; therefore/consequently, he decided to present using the information from the internet.

Prior to the presentation he had lost his notes; he, therefore/consequently, decided to present using the information from the internet.

Prior to the presentation he had lost his notes; he decided to present using the information from the internet, therefore/consequently.

Due to /because of his lost notes, he decided to present using the information from the internet.

Thank you very much for your help

Hope
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Comments  
Hi Spring,

Yes, they sound OK.

Clive
SpringDue to /because of his lost notes, he decided to present using the information from the internet.
Sorry, but I feel it should be rather: "due to /because of the loss of his notes, he decided to prepare his presentation using the information from the internet. I think the logical choice should be "because of", but somehow many native speakers are using "due to" in this context.

paco
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I wrote: Due to /because of his lost notes, he decided to present using the information from the internet.

Paco wrote: "due to /because of the loss of his notes, he decided to prepare his presentation using the information from the internet.

Clive says my sentence is OK; you say it is not. I am confused. Can you please explain why my sentence is incorrect?

Thank you

Hope
Hello Spring

I find your sentence odd in two points.

The first point is you used "present" as an intransitive verb. I suppose you used it to mean "make a presentation at a meeting" or "prepare presentation for a meeting" but the verb "present" itself does not have this sense. The verb "present" is almost always transitive and we have to use it like "He presented the results of his studies at the meeting"

The second problem is not grammatical but logical. Do you think "lost notes" can make someone decide to do something? I think the cause the person decided to use the internet information is the fact that he had lost his notes, i.e., the loss of his notes.

paco
The second half of your explanation makes sense to me. However, I will have to find out what transitive verbs are in order to understand the first half.

Would it sound better if I said

Having lost his notes, he decided to execute (or do) his presentation using the information from the internet.

Thank you

Hope
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Hi Spring,

Due to /because of his lost notes is correct grammar. I think the point raised concerns speaking more precisely, which is another issue.

Your original question was whether the sentences were grammatically correct, and whether they sounded OK. They are, and they do. I said they sounded OK because you will very commonly hear people say this kind of thing and if you say it, people will not all think that you are speaking incorrect English.

We don't always focus on precision when we speak. If it's necessary, we can add precision in later utterances, but often the meaning will be clear from what we originally said.

Best wishes, Clive
Hello Spring
SpringThe second half of your explanation makes sense to me. However, I will have to find out what transitive verbs are in order to understand the first half.
A transitive verb is a verb that requires both a subject and one or more objects. For example, the verb "lift" does not mean anything if it is not specified who lifted and what it was lifted (a bag, weights, a table, etc.). What it was lifted is the direct object of the verb since it receives the action of the verb. On the other hand, an intransitive verb is a verb that does not require or cannot take a direct object, e.g., "run", "sleep".

Some verbs can be both transitive and intransitive depending on meaning. As for "present" in the sense used in your sentence, it should be transitive as shown in the MSN dictionary's fourth definition below given.

present verb
Definitions:
1. [transitive verb] give something: to give or hand something to somebody, often in a humorously formal manner
(EX) "Then she presented me with the bill!"
2. [transitive verb] award something to somebody: to give or award something to somebody in a formal or ceremonial manner or at a ceremonial occasion
(EX) "The mayor came in person to present the prizes."
3. [transitive verb] offer something formally: to offer or convey something such as your compliments or apologies to somebody formally
(EX) "May I present my warmest congratulations?"
4. [transitive verb] hand something over officially: to put something forward for inspection or consideration, typically in a formal or official manner or capacity
(EX) "The proposals will be presented at the next meeting"
5. [transitive verb] make something evident: to show or display something
(EX) "Please take care to present your best side to the camera"
6. [transitive verb] pose problem: to pose a problem or difficulty to somebody
(EX) "Terrorism presents a direct threat to national security"
7. [transitive verb] law bring charge: to put a charge before a court of law so that it can be considered or tried
8. [transitive verb] introduce somebody formally: to introduce somebody formally, especially to somebody of higher rank
(EX) "They were presented to the Queen"
9. [transitive verb] introduce woman into society: to introduce a young woman formally into fashionable society
(EX) "Her family planned to present her at the Christmas debutante ball in New York"
10. [transitive verb] host program: to introduce, or act as the host of, a television or radio program or an infomercial
(EX) "He used to present a game show"
11. [transitive verb] offer public entertainment: to bring a movie, play, or other form of entertainment to the public
12. [transitive verb] portray something artistically: to represent something or somebody in a particular way in the arts
(EX) "In the film, Romeo and Juliet are presented as modern teenagers."
13. [reflexive verb] be in appointed place: to appear, especially at an appointed time and place
(EX) "Present yourselves at the gate at eight o'clock"
14. [reflexive verb] arise: to come into being or happen
(EX) "Be ready to do your best when an opportunity presents itself"
15. [intransitive verb] produce specific impression: to produce a particular impression, especially a favorable one ( formal )
(EX) "She presents as a pleasant young woman"
16. [intransitive verb] medicine have particular symptoms: to exhibit a particular symptom or symptoms on examination
17. [intransitive verb] medicine exit birth canal in position: to appear during the process of being born ( refers to fetuses )
SpringWould it sound better if I said Having lost his notes, he decided to execute (or do) his presentation using the information from the internet
It's a perfect sentence.

paco
Hi Clive,

Thank you very much for your explanation. You made me think.

Paco says that "Due to/because of his lost notes.." is not logical. Your post makes me wonder if an english sentence can be grammatically correct, sound OK, and yet be illogical?

Also, may lack of precision make our sentences illogical ?

Does vague equal illogical or just vague?

Thank you

Hope
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