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Hi,
Are the followings true?
"I have lost my key", without context, can mean:
1. I have lost it recently. Now I can't enter my house. This is the most common interpretation.
2. I lost it a while ago. It doesn't affect my current life. I have this life experience.
Because of the two different interpretations, it's necessary to keep in mind that when somebody lost their key just now and told me their problem, I can respond this way:
You have lost your key? Oh, I sympathize, because I have lost my key. It happened last year.
But I can't respond "Oh, I sympathize, because I have lost my key too" unless I have just lost it. Do you think so? Thank you very much.
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No. Only the first interpretation is meaningful. Losing keys is not such a significant experience in a person's life.


For life experience examples, consider:

I've been to China, Japan and Brazil, but not to Canada.

I've never eaten sushi.

Comments  
stephenlearnerAre the followings true?"I have lost my key", without context, can mean: 1. I have lost it recently. Now I can't enter my house. This is the most common interpretation. 2. I lost it a while ago. It doesn't affect my current life. I have this life experience.

If someone is standing next to his car and says " I've lost my keys". This needs no interpretation. He just realized his keyring is missing. Present perfect suggests that he didn't know when the keyring had disappeared but he knows at that instant, he can't find the keys.

stephenlearnerYou have lost your key? Oh, I sympathize, because I have lost my key. It happened last year.
This context has the wrong tense construction.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
 teechr's reply was promoted to an answer.

What is the correct tense construction?


How do you say “you lost your key a while ago“? I mean, how do you describe your life experience? Can this really not be regarded as a life experience? Why not? I think we can. In my entire life, I have this experience, and I still remember it vividly.