I just cruised past the book rack at Target (department store), and I spied a book whose title was "At the Boss's Beck and Call." That has always seemed a misconception of "beckoned call" to me. Looking it up, most sources think "beck" is a valid word and the phrase is correct. I found one source that agreed with my preconception
http://eggcorns.lascribe.net/english/77/beckoned-call /

I wonder what you think.
Gary Eickmeier
1 2
I just cruised past the book rack at Target (department store), and I spied a book whose title was "At ... and the phrase is correct. I found one source that agreed with my preconception http://eggcorns.lascribe.net/english/77/beckoned-call / I wonder what you think.

I don't, because up to today I had not seen either phrase, and the only meaning of 'beck' that I knew was a name - e.g. Jeff Beck. However, FWIW, I get the impression that you are mistaken to think that that site agrees with your preconception. The way I read it, the eggcorn site presents "beckoned call" as a misconception of "beck and call", which is the correct phrase.

You'd be crazy to e-mail me with the crazy. But leave the div alone.
I just cruised past the book rack at Target (department store), and I spied a book whose title was "At ... and the phrase is correct. I found one source that agreed with my preconception http://eggcorns.lascribe.net/english/77/beckoned-call / I wonder what you think.

I agree that your conception is an "eggcorn", but the misunderstanding is honestly come by (both found via One Look).
Of course "to beckon" is a gesture to someone, to get his attention and to urge him to approach. The "call" part might be just for emphasis, or I suppose it might involve the verbal orders the object is expected to obey:
Compact Oxford English dictionary has
beck (second entry)
. noun (in phrase at someone's beck and call) always having to be ready to obey someone's orders.
- ORIGIN abbreviated form of BECKON.
Am. Heritage Dictionary
ETYMOLOGY:
Middle English bek, from bekken, to beckon, alteration of bekenen ; see beckon
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I just cruised past the book rack at Target (department store), and I spied a book whose title was "At ... phrase is correct. I found one source that agreed with my preconception http://eggcorns.lascribe.net/english/77/beckoned-call / I wonder what you think. Gary Eickmeier

I think beck and call is composse of three words. Beckoned call is a misconception.

Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
I just cruised past the book rack at Target (department ... my preconception http://eggcorns.lascribe.net/english/77/beckoned-call / I wonder what you think. Gary Eickmeier

I think beck and call is composse of three words. Beckoned call is a misconception.

Yes.
"Beck" is from "beckon" which is to make a silent gesture: (OED) "intr. To make a mute signal or significant gesture with the head, hand, finger, etc.; now esp. in order to bid a person approach".

"Call" in the "beck and call" is a spoken command for a person to approach.
"At the Boss's Beck and Call" means that the person is required to respond to any demand from the Boss regardless of how the demand is conveyed and regardless of what else the person is doing at the time.

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
I think beck and call is composse of three words. Beckoned call is a misconception.

Yes. "Beck" is from "beckon" which is to make a silent gesture: (OED) "intr. To make a mute signal or ... is conveyed and regardless of what else the person is doing at the time. Peter Duncanson, UK (in alt.english.usage)

I am just pointing out that logically, and linguistically, and thinking like a grammar detective as most of us do, "beckoned call" makes more sense and has probably been misinterpreted by the usual suspects as "beck and call." There would be no reason to say both beckoning and call if they mean just about the same thing. But a "beckoned call" would be a call that was performed in the most effortless manner imaginable, by just beckoning with your pinkie. Imagine the boss just raising a hand from the next office and you have to come running. That sort of thing.
I'm just saying.
Gary Eickmeier
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I am just pointing out that logically, and linguistically, and thinking like a grammar detective as most of us do, ... the boss just raising a hand from the next office and you have to come running. That sort of thing.

This seems very reasonable.

Work is the curse of the drinking class.
I am just pointing out that logically, and linguistically, and thinking like a grammar detective as most of us do, "beckoned call" makes more sense and has probably been misinterpreted by the usual suspects as "beck and call."

"Beckoned call" does not make sense because it requires "beckoned" to be an adjective.
There would be no reason to say both beckoning and call if they mean just about the same thing.

They don't mean the same thing. A beckon is a gesture and a call is a shout.
The phrase might be clearer if it were "beck or call", but it isn't, so we have to live with it.

John Varela
Trade NEWlamps for OLDlamps for email
I wonder what you think.

Personally, I've always hated "beck and call" but some years back I consulted Merriam Webster and came up with this entry:
Main Entry: beck
Function: noun
Date: 14th century

1 chiefly Scottish : bow, curtsy
2 a : a beckoning gesture b : summons, bidding

— at one's beck and call : ready to obey one's command immediately
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