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Hi guys. I'd like to hear your opinion on the question I'm going to provide you with and which I have pondered for a while.

If I order the car until/till/before the end of March, they will provide me with snow tyres free of charge.

Do those can be used interchangeably without distorting the meaning of the sentence? Thank you in advance.Emotion: smile
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Hi

If I order the car before the end of March, they will provide me with snow tyres free of charge.

I have until the end of March to order the car and get snow tyres free of charge.

Before = earlier than - the end of March

Until = up to a particlar time/moment - in this case the end of March. So we have from now until/till that moment.
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Hi!

I'm not a native speaker but I would choose "before" as "until" and "till" seem to refer to some external factors, which are not dependent on us.

To prove my point, the following is taken from a song by Bob Dylan:

Then I'll stand on the ocean until I start sinkin',
But I'll know my song well before I start singin'
To my ear only 'before' works. Your ordering the car happens at an instant in time, not an interval or duration, so until and till won't work here.

What would work:

I can order the car until/till the end of March.
If I order the car between now and the end of March, ...

Just my two cents; others may think differently.
Thank you, guys - Opti, Ferdis and Michael. I got it.
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