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Began? Closing?

1. He began closing the door.

Is "began" an auxiliary verb in the sentence? And, what about "closing"? Is it a participle modifying "he," a gerund functioning as the direct object, or the main verb?

Thank you very much.
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This sentence sounds a bit strange to me maybe it is because of the word "began". Anyway, y try:

Is "began" an auxiliary verb in the sentence? No. It is called predicator. It is the verb of the sentence.

And, what about "closing"? Is it a participle modifying "he," a gerund functioning as the direct object, or the main verb? I would tell it is the predicator complement or the preposition of the verb. Main verb is "began" in this sentence.

Edit: preposition of the verb is wrong . I am so sorry. I have just recognized.
Hi,
I'm not sure, but that could have two meanings, and therefore two interpretations:

He began closing the door

1. he began to close the door
2. he began, and the first thing he did was close the door.

#2 might also be written with a comma: "He began, closing the door"

I'm not 100% sure, though. Emotion: smile
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The correct version is "He began to close the door".

"Began" is the finite verb, which agrees with the pronoun "he".

"Close" is the auxiliary verb, which stays in its infinitive form, "close".

Kooyeen is right, it could also be written "He began by closing the door". Here, the auxiliary verb is in its present participle form, "closing". This changes the meaning of the sentence.
Anonymous1. He began closing the door.

Is "began" an auxiliary verb in the sentence? And, what about "closing"? Is it a participle modifying "he," a gerund functioning as the direct object, or the main verb?
Began is the finite verb or the main verb and closing is its object.

CB

EDIT: Closing is a gerund as well.
Edit: preposition of the verb is wrong . I am so sorry. I have just recognized.
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A Cornish Pasty Kooyeen is right, it could also be written "He began by closing the door".
Hi Pasty,
I wrote it without "by"... Is that "by" needed? I thought it was not... Thanks Emotion: smile
One last thought about this sentence. And, I do appreciate your help.

Using the -ing form: He began closing the door. (Cool Breeze states that "closing" is the direct object, and this is also what I thought too.)

Using the infinitive: He began to close the door. (Now the infinitive functions as the direct object.)

Can the sentence be written with either form--the -ing or the infinitive?
Hi Kooyeen,

The by is needed because there are two ways of interpreting that sentence:

"He began to close the door" - He started to close it, but could have stopped while closing it.

"He began by closing the door" - He is about to start a chain of events, and the first thing he did was close the door.

"He began closing the door" - This would mean the same thing as the first explanation, he started to close the door but could have stopped. However this is incorrect grammar, and you would need to say "he began to close the door". "Began closing" is understandable but incorrect.

I hope it's clear enough for you :-)
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