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Is it alright to begin a sentence with 'for' in formal writing?

Does it depend on its meaning? For example, when it is a coordinating conjunction, can it begin a sentence?

I had a good example where I thought it was alright to use it, but I have forgotten it.

Any examples?

Thanks
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For cold and dry weather, children are mostly affected with it.

For your kind review, a presentaiton is hereby submitted.
Eddie88Is it alright to begin a sentence with 'for' in formal writing?

For example, when it is a coordinating conjunction, can it begin a sentence?

You have begun a sentence with for!Emotion: smile There are billions of possibilities in arranging sentences. It is impossible to say that something isnever done or is always correct or wrong. Perhaps a coordinating for can begin a sentence, perhaps not.
CB
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"For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that
whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life."
I'm the guy that made this post, and I just wanted to say that I am not proselytizing or preaching, nor am I hostile in any way to organized religion. I just posted that because that may be one of the most widely known sentences in the English language beginning with the word "for"
For he's a jolly good fellow,
For he's a jolly good fellow,
For he's a jolly good fellow,
Which nobody can deny.
Which nobody can deny,
Which nobody can deny,
For he's a jolly good fellow,
Which nobody can deny.

Lyrics End>
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Boatswain.
He is an Englishman!
For he himself has said it,
And it's greatly to his credit,
That he is an Englishman!
All.
That he is an Englishman!
Boatswain.
For he might have been a Roosian,
A French, or Turk, or Proosian,
Or perhaps Itali-an!
All.
Or perhaps Itali-an!
Boatswain.
But in spite of all temptations
To belong to other nations,
He remains an Englishman!
He remains an Englishman!
All.
For in spite of all temptations
To belong to other nations,
He remains an Englishman!
He remains an Englishman!

CJ
"For" is always a coordinating conjunction. As Bryan Garner says, some grammarians err on this point because they confuse the causal meaning of "for" with the subjunctive conjunctions "because" and "since." It's quite all right to use "For" at the beginning of a sentence, and Garner has several examples in his Modern American Usage.
The funny part about your question is that, in your own question, you have already provide for yourself an example, which answers your own question.

-"Is it alright to begin a sentence with 'for' in formal writing?

Does it depend on its meaning? For example, when it is a coordinating conjunction, can it begin a sentence?

I had a good example where I thought it was alright to use it, but I have forgotten it.

Any examples?

Thanks"


Sorry.
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