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Hello,

Would you please verify if the following sentences give the same meaning? If not, what is the best way to express the given idea? (Here, CT refers a software application)



(1) Attendance for this campus can be posted into CT from 11/01/05.

(2) Attendance for this campus can be posted into CT beginning 11/01/05.

(3) Attendance for this campus can be posted into CT starting 11/01/05.

(4) Attendance for this campus can be posted into CT starting from 11/01/05.

(5) Attendance for this campus can be posted into CT beginning from 11/01/05.



Thanks for your help.
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Hi Krish,

Would you please verify if the following sentences give the same meaning? If not, what is the best way to express the given idea? (Here, CT refers a software application)



(1) Attendance for this campus can be posted into CT from 11/01/05.

(2) Attendance for this campus can be posted into CT beginning 11/01/05.

(3) Attendance for this campus can be posted into CT starting 11/01/05.

(4) Attendance for this campus can be posted into CT starting from 11/01/05.

(5) Attendance for this campus can be posted into CT beginning from 11/01/05.



These are almost identical in meaning.

Depending on your situation, you might want to reword a bit to clarify this question. What if someone says 'Yes, I understand I can sit down on 11/01/05 and start inputting data to CT. But, can the data that I input relate to attendance on 10/31/05, or even earlier?'

Best wishes, Clive
Clive,

Sorry, If my questions weren't clear. My main focus was to find out the proper usage of from/beginning/starting/starting from/'beginning from' on these sentences. Regarding the context, there is an agreement between the sender and receiver of these sentences; that is,the receiver will input the attendance data starting from 11/01/05 (here, the act of inputting the data starts on 11/01/05) and exclude any attendance data that is earlier than the given date,11/01/05.

Thanks for your help.
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Hi again,

OK. These all seem OK and the same to me, except that I wouldn't use 'beginning from'. I'd just say 'beginning'.

(1) Attendance for this campus can be posted into CT from 11/01/05.

(2) Attendance for this campus can be posted into CT beginning 11/01/05.

(3) Attendance for this campus can be posted into CT starting 11/01/05.

(4) Attendance for this campus can be posted into CT starting from 11/01/05.

(5) Attendance for this campus can be posted into CT beginning from 11/01/05.



You could also use 'commencing'.

Clive
Thanks again, Clive.
When you see the word "before" in a sentence, ask "What will it do next?" or "What will happen next?"

1. The car was started. / The car was begun (The second is wrong)
2. I started the car. / I began the car. (same as 1)
3. It has started to rain. / It has begun to rain. (I would use started with focus on the rain, not situation)

4. The starting pitcher for tonight's game will be ___. (The first of something, future event)
5. The starting pitcher of tonight's game has begun walking out to the mound. (The first of something, following action)

So, personally, I would opt for sentence 3 in your examples as a general notice, 2 if there is an understanding of some following action (submit grades). I would not use 1, 4, or 5 unless you want to indicate a range (Attendance can be posted from 11/01/05 until 12/15/05).
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Dear rishonly,

You may also use «with effect from», for example «with effect from 27/10/2005». It is more businesslike. Emotion: smile

Kind regards, Emotion: smile

Goldmund
Hi

Is the sentence 'Attendance for this campus can be posted into CT as of 11/01/05.' admissible?
K.O.

I would use "as of" in reference to some completed action or change in the present. "Attendance for this campus can be checked through the CT program as of 11/01/05". As of Tuesday, I will be in Hawaii.
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