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By taking too low a dose, mums-to-be are at higher risk of their babies being born with these defects, Dr Sarah Jarvis told The Sun.
I read the above at theSun.co.uk
Please explain the grammatical form and function of "being" in "being born...
Is "being born" a passive structure ?

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JigneshbharatiBy taking too low a dose, mums-to-be are at higher risk of their babies being born with these defects, Dr Sarah Jarvis told The Sun.

The expression is to be born: He was born in 1998. In your sentence the preposition 'of' requires a gerund like all prepositions do. The gerund is 'being'. 'Their babies' is the subject of the gerund.

CB

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I can see you're having difficulty with such constructions as you've asked the same kind of question many times before.

"Being" is a verb and its function is predicator, i.e, head of the clause "their babies being born with these defects"

"Being born with these defects" is the full predicate, a non-finite verb phrase with "their babies" as its subject.

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Comments  
Thanks. So is it a reduced relative clause ( babies who are born with...)?
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Jigneshbharati Thanks. So is it a reduced relative clause ( babies who are born with...)?

No, it's not a reduced relative clause (i.e. one modifying "babies").

It's a full non-finite clause with "their babies" as subject and "being born with these defects" as predicate.

The clause functions not as modifier but as complement of the preposition "of".

Compare:

Mums-to-be are at higher risk of their babies being born with these defects. [clause as complement of "of"]

Babies (who are) born with these defects cannot effectively be treated. [relative clause modifying "babies"]