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Hi

To this day he would be an average businessman as he was being considered before.

--- Isn't it better to just say "as he was considered before" without "being"?
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Comments  
I think you're correct.
NewguestIsn't it better to just say "as he was considered before" without "being"?
Yes. That's better.

CJ
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NewguestTo this day he would be an average businessman as he was being considered before.
--- Isn't it better to just say "as he was considered before" without "being"?
To me, the meaning of the sentence is unclear. Perhaps more context would explain why the author included "being."
Hi

But does "being" make it incorrect or it just sounds worse?
"Being" is not incorrect. (past continuous)
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Hi

The whole sentence is: I suppose that if not this affair, he would still be a not-2-well-known-average businessman as he was being considered before.

So the affair helped him Emotion: smile
NewguestThe whole sentence is: I suppose that if not this affair, he would still be a not-2-well-known-average businessman as he was being considered before.
So the affair helped him Emotion: smile
The absence of "for" (if not [for] this affair) suggests that this was written long ago.
Even so, looking at the whole sentence, I think we should keep chopping:
". . . . average businessman, as he was before."

If you're considered not-well-known, at least they're talking about you!

Now, he is well-known. Before, he was not well-known.

Digging deeper into prior context, perhaps his boss or his coleagues had been considering him ineffective, and had been treating him accordingly. But the affair changed all that.
If this is true, the author may have a point.
AvangiThe absence of "for" (if not [for] this affair) suggests that this was written long ago.

Why do you think so? I don't understand.
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