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Hi

1. I think I've been followed.

2. I think I'm being followed.

--- Does the first one say that it has been happening for some time and the second that it's happening right at the time when I speak about it?
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1. I think I've been followed.

2. I think I'm being followed.

--- Does the first one say that it has been happening for some time and the second that it's happening right at the time when I speak about it?

1. The first means you have been followed in the past.

2. The second means you are being followed now.

b.zimmerman

1. The first means you have been followed in the past.

2. The second means you are being followed now.




Hi

Doesn't the present perfect tense indicate that something happened in the past and continues until now? If so, in my view the 1st one also suggests that I'm still being followed. What do you think?
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Hi,
I believe there is a difference of degree in meaning.
Newguest1. I think I've been followed. - This means that someone has been following you for a while. You don't know when the following had begun, but it's on going up to the time you realize it.

2. I think I'm being followed. - "Being" has the present element that it's happening as you speak.

Hi guys,

1. I think I've been followed.

The Present Perfect tells us "I" have been followed at some unspecified time in the past, and that this fact has some relevance to the present situation.

The tense does not tell us about the duration of the following, or about how often it happened. However, the context and indeed the specific vocabulary of the statement will often make matters clear.

Best wishes, Clive
Clive1. I think I've been followed.

The Present Perfect tells us "I" have been followed at some unspecified time in the past, and that this fact has some relevance to the present situation.

So as b.zimmerman suggested the following happened in the past and it's over by now? thanks.

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Hi,

So as b.zimmerman suggested the following happened in the past and it's over by now? thanks.

Not necessarily. But the context and the vocabulary often make that clear, as I said.

Consider these examples.

eg Help, a robber has shot me! The shooting clearly happened in the (recent) past.

eg I have worked here for the last ten years. I love my job. Suggests I still work here.

Clive
NewguestHi

1. I think I've been followed.

2. I think I'm being followed.

--- Does the first one say that it has been happening for some time and the second that it's happening right at the time when I speak about it?

"and the second, that it's happening right at the time when I speak about it?" This part is certainly true, but your analysis of the first one is not really complete. It depends on context. You could have been followed a long time ago or just recently. The following incident(s) may have continued only for a brief time and then stopped or may have extended into the present.

"It's been happening for some time" is only one reason for using the present perfect; another reason for using the present perfect is to state for the record that it is part of your experience, no matter how long ago that experience was. (I've seen that movie; I've visited that country; I've gotten drunk; I've traveled on a monorail train; I've seen the Appalachian Mountains; I've dived naked into the Pacific Ocean; ...)

CJ
Thanks for the answers guys. I think it's clearer.

What if I joined these two sentences, i.e. I say to somebody: I think I've been followed and I'm afraid I'm still being followed. Would it make sense in your view?
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