Hi,
Could you please be so kind as to read this and give your opinion?

"Professor Freelove has been in a coma since the car accident."

IN A COMA indicates a location, not state of being. Although COMATOSE is a state of being, being IN A COMA is not. Therefore, the verb is intransitive.
It is from a University in U.S.A. that gives an "on-line guide to grammar, style and punctuation for journalists".
Thanks a lot in advance.
Irma.
1 2
Could you please be so kind as to read this and give your opinion? "Professor Freelove has been in a ... of being. Although COMATOSE is a state of being, being IN A COMA is not. Therefore, the verb is intransitive.

We can also say "in a trance", "in a stupor", "in a funny mood" or even "in a tizzy(1)". I can't think of adjectives for those states that match "in a coma - comatose".
I don't see how "in a coma" can indicate a location and not a state.

Owain
(1) In a tizzy - state of nervous excitement or confusion; a dither.
Hi, Could you please be so kind as to read this and give your opinion? "Professor Freelove has been in ... of being. Although COMATOSE is a state of being, being IN A COMA is not. Therefore, the verb is intransitive.

Sorry, the above three sentences should have been in quotes, too. It is what the university says.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Hi, Could you please be so kind as to read ... IN A COMA is not. Therefore, the verb is intransitive.

Sorry, the above three sentences should have been in quotes, too. It is what the university says.

It is from a University in U.S.A. that gives an "on-line guide to grammar, style and punctuation for journalists". Thanks a lot in advance. Irma.

Excuse me, Sir, where is the next coma? Emotion: smile
Seriuosly, "in a coma" seems to me similar to "in a hurry". Now, "in a hurry" is most certainly not a location, is it?
Do you happen to have the URL if the site?
Could you please be so kind as to read this ... IN A COMA is not. Therefore, the verb is intransitive.

We can also say "in a trance", "in a stupor", "in a funny mood" or even "in a tizzy(1)". I ... "in a coma - comatose". I don't see how "in a coma" can indicate a location and not a state.

I think the same, but I wanted to know from native speakers if there was a possibility I didn't take into account. As this is a course from a University you never imagine to have these sort of mistakes...

Thanks for your comment Owain.
Irma.
Excuse me, Sir, where is the next coma? Emotion: smile Seriuosly, "in a coma" seems to me similar to "in a hurry". Now, "in a hurry" is most certainly not a location, is it? Do you happen to have the URL if the site?

Here you have:
http://grammar.uoregon.edu/verbs/linking.html
and thanks for your comment :-)
Irma.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Excuse me, Sir, where is the next coma? Emotion: smile Seriuosly, ... Do you happen to have the URL if the site?

Here you have: http://grammar.uoregon.edu/verbs/linking.html and thanks for your comment :-) Irma.

Your welcome!
Sometimes I'm a little slow on the uptake. Now I understand that the "location-indication" serves just as an explanation for the fact that the verb (to be) is intransivite, in this case.
Actually, I don't think this site shows bad English, they just give funny explanations. Emotion: smile
"Irma" wrote We can also say "in a trance", "in ... a coma" can indicate a location and not a state.

I think the same, but I wanted to know from native speakers if there was a possibility I didn't take into account. As this is a course from a University you never imagine to have these sort of mistakes...

Given that the first example is:
"The test indicate that Sarah is a genius.",
it doesn't inspire confidence.

Ray.
Hi, Could you please be so kind as to read this and give your opinion? "Professor Freelove has been in ... intransitive. It is from a University in U.S.A. that gives an "on-line guide to grammar, style and punctuation for journalists".

I've had a looki at the site that this example comes from and I must say that I find the "grammatical" explanations a little bit strange - cerainly the terminology is a bit unusual and I have the impression that the person running this site isn't particularly well-versed in the formal study of grammar.
On the example above, I agree with the others who commented taht "in a coma2 refers to a state - in this case a physical state, but similar structures, e.g. "in a hurry" or "in a tizzy", can refer to mental states, too.
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more