+0
The verb "BE" isn't used in the progressive tenses, right?

But how do you explain this?

WHAT ARE YOU BEING SO SMUG ABOUT IT?

YOU'RE BEING VAGUE.

?????????????????????????
1 2
Comments  (Page 2) 
Not Ok with me. I'm confused!

Forgive me for being ill.
Forgive me for being angry.

Why 'being ill' works? Is that something we can control? You are either ill or healthy. Huh?
You could also say:

You are being silly. Meaning right now.
You are silly. Meaning in general.

Bear in mind that both can be affectionate terms.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Both are fine, Pastel: in this case, both are apologies, both use the '-ing' form to stress the embarrassing immediacy of the condition, from the speaker's viewpoint.

'She was being angry' also emphasizes the emotional nearness of the speaker-- in this case the speaker suggests that s/he thinks the girl was faking or over-reacting with anger.

The former case is more common, so it sounds more 'natural' to us; but the second is just as possible, and for the same reason-- as a previous poster noticed.
Pastel,

You've introduced a new element in the "forgive" set -- the preposition "for". The only verb form that can follow a preposition is the gerund (ing form). So after "for" you don't have the possibility of contrast between an ing form and a non-ing form. You just have to use the only option: ing.

The question before was about the choice between two possibilities (is angry vs. is being angry). For your examples ("forgive for"), there is no choice.

Hope that helped.

Jim