+0
Hello Friends,

This is the original sentence.

THE scale and intensity of unprecedented transformations and interventions have enhanced the vulnerability of many integrated social-ecological systems, the Sundarbans being one of them.

I would like to know whether using "is" instead of "being" here would be grmmatically legitimate. I didn't understand why the writer has used "being" instead of "is".

Could some one please explain.

Thanks

Sabya

Comments  
Hi Sabya,

No, you can't put "is" in place of "being" without rewriting.

THE scale and intensity of unprecedented transformations and interventions have enhanced the vulnerability of many integrated social-ecological systems, the Sundarbans being one of them. - okay

THE scale and intensity of unprecedented transformations and interventions have enhanced the vulnerability of many integrated social-ecological systems, and the Sundarbans is one of those systems. (You could use "them," referring back to socio-ecological systems, but this makes it a little easier for your reader.)
Thanks a lot Grammar Geek.

As my english is not very strong I couldn't understand your explanation very clearly. Could you please elaborate on this.

Thanks,

Sabya
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Let's try with a simpler sentence.

Mary makes delicious cookies, chocolate chip being my favorite.

If you changed being to is you get this: *Mary makes delicious cookies, chocolate chip is my favorite.

This is called a comma splice - Both parts are complete sentences, and you cannot join them with a comma. You need a conjunction (like "and") or you need to make them two sentences.

Mary makes delicious cookies, and chocolate chip is my favorite [type of cookie]. (Or: Mary makes delicious cookies. Chocolate chip is my favorite.

Does looking at this simpler sentence help, or are you still a little confused?
Congratulations on your Guru status, Barbara!Emotion: smile

You may have to write MM to be upgraded (at 5,000 posts; doesn't quite work automatically, perhaps a prob in the programs).
Thanks Emotion: smile
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Thanks Barbara,

I seached for "comma splice" on the Internet after I saw your reply and consulted a book on punctuation (By Oxford University Press). What I understood is "comma splice" is a common error that most of the people often make.

The book said "It's not normally correct to join the clauses of a compund sentence without a conjunction (the so-called "comma splice").

For example,

*His was the last house,the road ended with him

Now this could be corrected as

His was the last house, and the road ended with him.

or

His was the last house; the road ended with him.

As you suggested this can also be corrected as

His was the last house, the road being ended with him (Please correct me if i am wrong).


His was the last house, the road ending with him (Please correct me if i am wrong).


So we have three ways to correct "comma splice" 1) put a conjunction 2) put semicolon 3) use -ing clause.

I have one more question.

In the below sentence.

Kim is an actor, Pat is a teacher, and Tim is an engineer.

In this case, can it be a case of "comma splice" and corrected as

Kim is an actor, and Pat is a teacher, and Tim is an engineer.

Could you please calrify my doubts.

Thanks,

Sabya
Of your two suggestions about the road, your second one is much more natural. I'm not sure that I can explain why - perhaps "the road being still under construction beyond that" works.

A comma splice is when you join just the two - if you have a list (Kim is..., Pat is... , and Tim is...) then you can join them with comma until you get to the last one, when you do need the "and."

Your instincts about how this works seem very good!
Thanks a lot Barbara.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?