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Being a marketing graduate, I believe I am the perfect candidate for this role

I understand that 'being' participle phrases can convey the same meaning as 'because I am...' (adverbial of reason).

What about this participle phrase? Does it show--at all --that I believe I'm the perfect candidate because I have a marketing degree?

Having a marketing degree, I believe I am the perfect candidate for this role.

I don't think so, but I'm sure others may infer differently.

Thanks for your time.
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English 1b3
What about this participle phrase? Does it show--at all --that I believe I'm the perfect candidate because I have a marketing degree?

Having a marketing degree, I believe I am the perfect candidate for this role.


It implies that the marketing degree is an important reason -- if not the sole reason -- why you believe you are the perfect candidate.

Although it would usually pass, I'm not sure whether the structure of this sentence is technically absolutely correct. To me, it has a faint dangling-participle-like feel to it, even though in theory the agreement seems correct. I'd be interested to hear what others think, if anyone's passing by. Perhaps I'm just imagining it.
I am the one who is a graduate in marketing. I am the one who has the degree. I am the one who believes .... I am the one who is the perfect candidate.

It's all I, I, I, so I don't see the dangling participle connection. Emotion: smile

Maybe something else about the sentence bothers you, and it's manifested itself as a suspicion about the participial construction? Emotion: thinking

CJ
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English 1b3What about this participle phrase? Does it show--at all --that I believe I'm the perfect candidate because I have a marketing degree?

Having a marketing degree, I believe I am the perfect candidate for this role.
The semantic relationship between a participial phrase and the accompanying main clause can be vague, but the because relationship is certainly one of the candidates in this particular sentence.

CJ
Thanks.

Do you prefer the 'being' participle phrase I wrote over the 'having' participle phrase--since the relationship, I feel, is clearer?
English 1b3Do you prefer the 'being' participle phrase I wrote over the 'having' participle phrase--since the relationship, I feel, is clearer?
Yes. I think I have a slight preference for the being phrase, but only slight. It's your choice.

CJ
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CalifJimI am the one who is a graduate in marketing. I am the one who has the degree. I am the one who believes .... I am the one who is the perfect candidate.

It's all I, I, I, so I don't see the dangling participle connection.

Maybe something else about the sentence bothers you, and it's manifested itself as a suspicion about the participial construction?


I think what vaguely troubles me is that "Having a marketing degree" seems to be describing an activity concurrent with the act of believing, rather than describing a state of affairs that is the reason for the belief. I'm not sure if that makes any sense, but I can't think of another way to explain it.
I understand what you mean, but as CJ pointed out, it is sometimes hard to establish how a participle phrase relates to the main clause, and thus it is up to the reader to decide. In this case, I think, as does CJ, the phrase's relationship with the main clause (an adverbial of reason) is just clear enough.
English 1b3In this case, I think, as does CJ, the phrase's relationship with the main clause (an adverbial of reason) is just clear enough.

Yes, I have no problem understanding the intention of the sentence.
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