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I walked along the sidewalks on my way to the electronic store. (Note: I didn't walk on the sidewalks because they were broken. Please correct the sentence if that's not what it means) As I came close to a tree, I heard noises of birds chirping in the tree. Immediately, I sensed the danger of being pooped on so I swerved into the street without so much thinking. That was when I was hit by a car from behind.

Are there any mistakes?

Thanks.
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I walked along the sidewalks on my way to the electronic store. (Note: I didn't walk on the sidewalks because they were broken. Please correct the sentence if that's not what it means) As I came close to a tree, I heard noises of birds chirping in the tree. Immediately, I sensed the danger of being pooped on so I swerved (I wouldn't use swerve here - I jumped out) into the street without so much thinking . That was when I was hit by a car from behind. (My preference - that was when I was hit from behind by a car.)

It is not clear to me where you were walking. If you were not on the sidewalk, as you say, were you in the road/walking in the gutter?

My suggestion:

I walked along the kerb on my way to the electronic store..........
optilangas you say, were you in the road/walking in the gutter?
YES.( I had to look up the meaning of gutter in the context of road) I believe a bowling alley has a gutter on each side, am I right?

Also, do curb and kerb have the same meaning?
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New2grammar
optilangas you say, were you in the road/walking in the gutter?
YES.( I had to look up the meaning of gutter in the context of road) I believe a bowling alley has a gutter on each side, am I right?

Also, do curb and kerb have the same meaning?

I believe a bowling alley has a gutter on each side, am I right? - I know it as the return gulley.

Also, do curb and kerb have the same meaning? - I only use kerb when talking about the side of a road.
optilang
New2grammar
optilangas you say, were you in the road/walking in the gutter?
YES.( I had to look up the meaning of gutter in the context of road) I believe a bowling alley has a gutter on each side, am I right?

Also, do curb and kerb have the same meaning?

I believe a bowling alley has a gutter on each side, am I right? - I know it as the return gulley.

Also, do curb and kerb have the same meaning? - I only use kerb when talking about the side of a road.

I think again it's just a difference between American and British English. Americans spell it curb, and refer to the 'gutters' in a bowling alley.

Two nations, separated by a common language. Emotion: rolleyes
Why is the role of return in return gulley? Are you talking about the belt that brings your bowling ball back to your seats? I was referring to the narrow channels on both sides of a bowling alley. If it's what you are talkig about, what do you call the belt?

Thanks.
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I was referring to the narrow channels on both sides of a bowling alley. - the gutters.
So, the belt thing is called gulley, right?

Sorry for the seemingly endless questions. One last question, I promise.

What if I was pushing a bicycle (The rationale is it had broken)? Would you say swerve or jump out into the street?

Thanks.
New2grammarSo, the belt thing is called gulley, right?

Sorry for the seemingly endless questions. One last question, I promise.

What if I was pushing a bicycle (The rationale is it had broken)? Would you say swerve or jump out into the street?

Thanks.

If you were pushing the bicycle I would use jump out. If you were riding the bicycle I would use swerve.
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