+0
A. Fortunately, I have a record of being consistently the top-notcher in our class when I was in high school.
B. Fortunately, I have a record of having been consistently the top-notcher in our class when I was in high school.

C. I would say that from past experience I enjoyed working being part of a team.
D. I would say that from past experience I enjoyed working having been part of a team.

1. Which is correct in each pair?
2. Do you think "being" in A is not proper because I'm no longer in high school? Also, is "being" in C not proper because I'm currently not part of any team?
3. If both are OK, what is the difference? When do we choose "being" over "having been" and vice versa?

Please advise. I would really appreciate your thoughts on this.
1 2
Comments  
Hi,

Consider these simple examples to ge the general idea.

Being wounded, I am bleeding all over the floor.
'Being wounded' refers to the present situation.

Having been wounded 20 years ago, I know that it hurts a lot.
'Having been wounded' refers to the present result of something that happened in the past.

A. Fortunately, I have a record of being consistently the top-notcher in our class when I was in high school.
B. Fortunately, I have a record of having been consistently the top-notcher in our class when I was in high school.

C. I would say that from past experience I enjoyed working being part of a team.
D. I would say that from past experience I enjoyed working having been part of a team.

1. Which is correct in each pair?
2. Do you think "being" in A is not proper because I'm no longer in high school? Also, is "being" in C not proper because I'm currently not part of any team?
3. If both are OK, what is the difference? When do we choose "being" over "having been" and vice versa? See my example above.

Your sentences are so clumsy Emotion: crying that I don't want to comment in detail.
Instead, here's what I suggest. I assume that it is an application, for example for a job.

I was consistently at the top of my class in high school.

My record shows that I work well on teams.

If you need more help, plese post again.
Clive
Thank you, Clive, for your explanations and suggestions. I really appreciate them.

Just to further know the difference between "being" and "having been", if the last part of the following sentences are left unchanged and I'm currently not part of any team, which one is correct or better? I believe your suggested sentence is best, though.

C. I enjoyed working being part of a team.
D. I enjoyed working having been part of a team.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Hi,
Just to further know the difference between "being" and "having been", if the last part of the following sentences are left unchanged and I'm currently not part of any team, which one is correct or better? I believe your suggested sentence is best, though.

These are still really poor and clumsy.
C. I enjoyed working being part of a team. Sounds like you liked to be part of a team when you worked.

D. I enjoyed working having been part of a team. Sounds like you once worked as apart of aa team. And later, when you working but not on a team, you were glad that you had that original experience. Odd thing to say. Emotion: stick out tongue

Clive
Thank you, again, Clive, for your response. Could you further assist me on my questions below, please?
CliveThese are still really poor and clumsy.
C. I enjoyed working being part of a team. Sounds like you liked to be part of a team when you worked.
In this case, using "being" doesn't necessarily refer to the present situation in contrast to your given example earlier. Is my understanding correct?

Your interpretation of sentence C is what I really want to express. My sentence, though, is still poor and clumsy. I really want to use the word "enjoy". Do you think the following is better to say about my past experience of working on a team?

I enjoyed working as part of a team.
CliveD. I enjoyed working having been part of a team. Sounds like you once worked as apart of aa team. And later, when you working but not on a team, you were glad that you had that original experience. Odd thing to say.Emotion: stick out tongue
I would just avoid using this. Emotion: shake

Hi,

Could you further assist me on my questions below, please?

(missing image) CliveThese are still really poor and clumsy.
C. I enjoyed working being part of a team. Sounds like you liked to be part of a team when you worked.

In this case, using "being" doesn't necessarily refer to the present situation true in contrast to your given example earlier. I forget what my previous example was. Is my understanding correct?

Your interpretation of sentence C is what I really want to express. My sentence, though, is still poor and clumsy. Yes, it is. I really want to use the word "enjoy". Do you think the following is better to say about my past experience of working on a team? Yes, definitely.

I enjoyed working as part of a team.

Or you could say "I enjoy working as part of a team'. This means you enjoyed it in the past, and you will enjoy it in the future.

(missing image) Clive“D. I enjoyed working having been part of a team. Sounds like you once worked as apart of aa team. And later, when you working but not on a team, you were glad that you had that original experience. Odd thing to say.Emotion: stick out tongue

I would just avoid using this.

Clive

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thank you so much for helping me with this. I now understand. Emotion: smile

I guess I can now put this thread and the part 1 thread to rest.
Hi,

Hurrah!

Ask again if you need more help later

Clive
That made me laugh. Emotion: big smile

OK, I will if another question pops in my head. Thanks so much.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more