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Hello

I sometimes hear so many English speakers say "being" instead of "is that."

Here are some phrases:
• "the point is that" vs. "the point being"
• "the reason is that" vs. "the reason being"
• "one thing I noticed a lot is that" vs. "one thing I noticed a lot being"

Please tell me why English speakers say "being" instead of "is that"? What kind of a grammar structure is it?
I would like to know more about this structure. Where should we use this structure?

Thank you for taking the time to help me.
Best
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AnonymousWhat kind of a grammar structure is it?
It is a participial (reduced) clause, modifying the preceding noun.

The point is that he left in an angry state. (This is a complete sentence.)
The point being that he left in an angry state (This is a fragment, not a complete sentence.)
AnonymousWhere should we use this structure?
It is sometimes used for emphasis, as part of a larger sentence.
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AnonymousPlease tell me why English speakers say "being" instead of "is that"?
A phrase with 'being', like those in your examples, can be added to another sentence to explain it further without making another full sentence.

Some writers place commas randomly throughout their texts, the reason being that they really don't know how to punctuate.

You will also see these written as two sentences even though it's not right:

Some writers place commas randomly throughout their texts. The reason being that they really don't know how to punctuate.

CJ