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will3 (verb)
transitive
2 d : to cause or change by an act of will *believed he could will himself to succeed*; also : to try to do so
[M-W's Col. Dic.]

The example phrase implies that the subject believes she/he could steer herself/himself to succeed. In other words, she/he is trying to change the course through their will. The second part of the definition "also: to try to do so" is a bit redundant, in my very humble opinion. Because the first definition and the example phrase in themselves contain that "try" element. Please guide me. Thanks.
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Jackson6612a bit redundant, in my very humble opinion.
No, not redundant.

If you will yourself to fly by flapping your ears, and you are actually flying, you've willed yourself to fly. (You've changed something by an act of the will. - Main definition.)

If you will yourself to fly by flapping your ears, and you fail to gain altitude, even so, you've willed yourself to fly. (You've tried to change something by an act of the will. - Second definition.)

CJ
Comments  
My understanding is that the difference between the two is the ultimate fact of success.

In some cases, "I believe I can will this to happen" has a supernatural intent.

It's quite different from saying, "I'm going to try very hard to make this happen."

When you look at it after the fact, it's easy to say "This happened because I willed it to happen."

This could mean different things to different people.

I didn't study or read any of the material for the exam. I just willed myself to succeed.
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A person can try to will himself/herself to succeed, in other words, try that strategy of using the will alone to see if it will work. So no, the "try" part is not redundant.
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
CalifJim
Jackson6612a bit redundant, in my very humble opinion.
No, not redundant. If you will yourself to fly by flapping your ears, and you are actually flying, you've willed yourself to fly. (You've changed something by an act of the will. - Main definition.)If you will yourself to fly by flapping your ears, and you fail to gain altitude, even so, you've willed yourself to fly. (You've tried to change something by an act of the will. - Second definition.)CJ
Thanks, CJ.

If I will myself to pass the exams starting after two days but then waste all the time sleeping and playing video games, then what's the point of willing myself? In my humble opinion (which might be grossly wrong), I think "will" in itself implies determination and struggle. Please guide me now. Thank you.
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