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which ones correct

my father belongs to london
or
my father belongs from london

can "belong" be used with "from" as in "belong/s from" ??
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Hi,

which ones correct

my father belongs to london

or

my father belongs from london

can "belong" be used with "from" as in "belong/s from" ?? No. Don't use 'belong' that way.

Say this.

My father lives in London. (He's there now)

My father is from London. (He was born there, lived there)

Clive
Please clarify why the first sentence is not good enough. Can't I say,
I belong to London.
If yes, why can't we use the original sentence?
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Anonymousmy father belongs to london
or
my father belongs from london

can "belong" be used with "from" as in "belong/s from" ??
No, "belong" is never used with "from".
"my father belongs to london" sounds really strange, if the intended meaning is: London is the place where he likes to live".

Usage:If you do not have the ballroom dance basics, you don't belong to the advanced class.
Belong -in this context suggest "deserve to be". i.e. I don't belong here. ( I deserve better...!)
I am still confused. Can the teachers help me understand why I should not say,
I belong to London.
I belong to St. Martin's school.
He does not belong to this family.
I don't know how else I can explain it better. The meaning of "belong" varies according to contexts in which it's used.

This parking space belongs to me but this car has been parked here since yesterday. - meaning, I own it.
This plantation belonged to my great grandfather and was passed onto my father. - This means my great grandfather owned it, and now the plantation belongs to my father.

On the other hand, your sentence "I belong to London" has a different meaning. It suggests that there are characteristics or things your like about the city that offer you a sense of "belonging", or feeling right at home, so to speak.
zafar142003I belong to St. Martin's school.
It's unclear what the sentence really means. Does it mean you go to St Martin's School?
If you Google "belong, usage", you may get a better answer than my explanations.
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Thanks for explaining dimsum. I get the hang of it.
zafar142003I am still confused. Can the teachers help me understand why I should not say,
I belong to London.
I belong to St. Martin's school.
He does not belong to this family.
belong to = be owned by

This pen belongs to me. = This pen is owned by me. = I own this pen. (Most likely, I bought this pen or it was given to me.)

These cars belong to my father. = These cars are owned by my father. = My father owns these cars. (Most likely, my father bought these cars or they were given to him.)

I belong to London. = I am owned by London. = London owns me. (Most likely, London bought me or I was given to it.) ???
I belong to St. Martin's school. = I am owned by St. Martin's school. = St. Martin's school owns me. (Most likely, St. Martin's school bought me or I was given to it.) ???

CJ
I was thinking ... maybe the original poster heard or read something like "I belong here", where belong has another meaning, that of feeling happy in a certain place or situation?

Just speculating (or maybe mudding the waters)! Emotion: stick out tongue
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