Here's some amusing proof that the great war over split infinitives has been raging for at least 110 years. In a letter to the editor of the London Daily Chronicle written in 1892, George Bernard Shaw dissed one of its journalists for upholding the split infinitive rule :
Sir,
If you do not immediately suppress the person who takes it upon himself to lay down the law almost every day in your columns on the subject of literary composition, I will give up taking The Chronicle. The man is a pedant, an ignoramus, an idiot, a self-advertising duffer. A little while ago, when somebody pointed out to him a case of the misuse of "and which", the creature, utterly missing the point, rushed about denouncing every sentence containing "and which" until some public-spirited subscriber of yours stopped him by a curt exposure which would have shamed any corrigible human being into humble silence for at least a month.
Yet he has already broken out in a fresh place. Mr. Andrew Lang, moved by a personal antipathy to "split infinitives" and to sentences ending with the word "such" (for example, Shakespeare's line, "No glory lives behind the back of such") once made a jocular attempt to bounce the public out of using them by declaring that they were bad English. Of course, all competent literary workmen laughed at Mr. Lang's little trick; but your fatuous specialist, driven out of his "and which" stronghold, is now beginning to rebuke "second-rate newspapers" for using such phrases as "to suddenly go" and "to boldly say".

I ask you, Sir, to put this man out. Give the porter orders to use such violence as may be necessary if he attempts to return, without, however, interfering with his perfect freedom of choice between "to suddenly go," "to go suddenly", and "suddenly to go". See that he does not come back; that is the main thing. And allow me, as one who has some little right to speak on the subject, to assure your readers that they may, without the slightest misgiving, use adverbed infinitives in any of the three ways given above. All they need consider is which of the three best conveys by its rhythm the feeling they wish to express.
Yours, &c.,
G. Bernard Shaw
Too bad GBS isn't still around. As you can see, he was almost obnoxious enough to pass for a typical Usenet poster.
Your pal,
Barney
Deprived of art, life instantly becomes so brutalized as to be devoid of interest. Further, there is a worse thing than no art at all - namely, the saccharine travesty of art supplied by Hollywood.
Wyndham Lewis
Here's some amusing proof that the great war over split infinitives has been raging for at least 110 years. In ... GBS isn't still around. As you can see, he was almost obnoxious enough to pass for a typical Usenet poster.

I was intrigued by the use of the modern-seeming "bounce ... out of" doing a thing. What's the first reference for that in the OED? I've looked in NSOED, which seems not to list the usage.

Matti
Here's some amusing proof that the great war over split ... one of its journalists for upholding the split infinitive rule:

(snip)
Mr. Andrew Lang, moved by a personal antipathy to "split ... of using them by declaring that they were bad English.

(snip)
I was intrigued by the use of the modern-seeming "bounce ... out of" doing a thing. What's the first reference for that in the OED? I've looked in NSOED, which seems not to list the usage.

It's in the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue: "to bully a man out of any thing." I don't recognize it, myself.
Cassell's says, late 18th c. for "to boast, to brag, to bully, to scold, to intimidate (cf Captain Bounce)." Then it has "Captain Bounce, (18C) a bully, a braggart" which is cf'ed further to Captain Bluff, Captain Grand, and Captain Hackum.
Now, RHHDAS also has a meaning "to bully, to intimidate." It gives some British uses around 1811-12 and then US citations for 1846 (Melville), 1859, 1892, and then big jump 1986.
1986 Stroud /Close Pursuit/ 95: Wolfie, you gonnabounce every *** in town? Your attitude sucks,
buddy.
All I can find about this last is that it's a book called Close Pursuit, A Week In The Life Of An NYPD Homicide Cop by Carsten Stroud. It's always interesting when some old piece of slang turns up after decades. I like to think that things still survive by oral tradition.
Best Donna Richoux
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Here's some amusing proof that the great war over split infinitives has been raging for at least 110 years. In ... GBS isn't still around. As you can see, he was almost obnoxious enough to pass for a typical Usenet poster.

As Oscar Wilde said, 'Almost don't hardly cut it Bubba'
John 'obnoxious enough to pass for a typical Usenet poster and then some' Dean
Oxford
De-frag to reply
Mr. Andrew Lang, moved by a personal antipathy to "split ... of using them by declaring that they were bad English.

I was intrigued by the use of the modern-seeming "bounce ... out of" doing a thing. What's the first reference for that in the OED? I've looked in NSOED, which seems not to list the usage.

OED has:
>
And if it was in a Dictionary in 1812, we may imagine it had been around a little while. The next cite is :
>

'Well bounced?' My wife heard 'well shamed' in to 80s when teaching and we thought that modern.

John 'And that was just the Head ...' Dean
Oxford
De-frag to reply
I was intrigued by the use of the modern-seeming "bounce ... out of" doing a thing. What's the first reference for that in the OED? I've looked in NSOED, which seems not to list the usage. Matti

To me, it seems archaic rather than modern. I've never heard anyone use the verb "bounce" in that sense. Much more common is the noun "bouncer" - a big guy who hangs around clubs or restaurants to intimidate troublemakers.

Your pal,
Barney
Deprived of art, life instantly becomes so brutalized as to be devoid of interest. Further, there is a worse thing than no art at all - namely, the saccharine travesty of art supplied by Hollywood.
Wyndham Lewis
Try out our live chat room.
(snip) (snip)

I was intrigued by the use of the modern-seeming "bounce ... looked in NSOED, which seems not to list the usage.

It's in the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue: "to bully a man out of any thing." I don't recognize ... some old piece of slang turns up after decades. I like to think that things still survive by oral tradition.

Donna, your education has been sadly neglected.
I have read the book in the last two years. (The bar, er, cafe, in the school I work for in Prague has an eclectic mix of English language paperbacks for the teachers and the students who dare to try to read them.) I'll try to find it in order to verify my impression now that bounce must have been used in the sense of roust. The only dictionary I have to hand at 5:33 as I write this gives this incomplete definition:
v (T) AmE to make someone move from a place; (example) Go roust the kids, it's time we went,
substantially different from a police roust(ing) which I have always understood to be a kind of raid, most likely the kind of raid that has not much legal authority/ization (e.g., a search warrant) something like the famous line, "Round up the usual suspects' in Casablanca.
BTW, if you have to ask what I'm doing up at 5:33, you don't understand the life of an itinerant language teacher in Prague (g). BTW2, the police type of roust, I think, as I recall from lawyer days, is a term that might be used on both sides of the fence. Or, perhaps was used only by older cops and older rounders I am cetain that I heard it used about twenty years ago by JP, an old lag who was a rounder (g). The rest may be wishful reminiscing.
aokay