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My company is going into new countries, everybody in the administration is taking an English course. During this course one teacher claimed that you should never, never use the greeting “Best regards”. Instead you should use “Yours sincerely” or “Kind regards”.

Well, when I went to business School in 1979 I only learned that you should only use the phrase "Yours faithfully,".

Reading this very long thread I think that one should conclude that if you know the person, you can use "Yours sincerely", and if you do not know the person, you should use "Yours faithfully".

Is this correct?

Someone wrote that you might capitalize the first letter in both words. What is the significance of that and what would it mean?

Yours faithfully,

Benny Bubel

More: Yours sincerely or Sincerely yours

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Comments  (Page 4) 
Well, I'm a Finn too. I personally use a bi language approach:

Terveisin/Regards,

My Name
Contact details

Terveisin means about the same as Regards. Semi informal ang commonly used in emails.
Regards = Terveisin => terv. (informal) ==> t. (very informal)
Kind regards = Ystävällisin terveisin => Yst. terv.
hi

i use warm regards in all of my emails whethere formal or informal.i dont know whether it is the best one to use or not.but after i read your thread i may have to think about that.one more thing is i would always like to use the one which is not used by many,but also that should be appropriate.can anyone please suggest one for me....,i usually have to send emails to my cleints all over the world...
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Anonymoushi

i use warm regards in all of my emails whethere formal or informal.i dont know whether it is the best one to use or not.but after i read your thread i may have to think about that.one more thing is i would always like to use the one which is not used by many,but also that should be appropriate.can anyone please suggest one for me....,i usually have to send emails to my cleints all over the world...

Well, I'm not sure "the one which is not used by many" will always be the most appropriate, Anon.

Why not use "Kind regards"? No one can complain, if you regard them kindly.

MrP
Being norwegian I would probably prefer the first few incomming business emails to be ended by "Kind regards" and then quickly becomming less formal. Especially after I have met the sender in person I would prefer an informal ending...

Gaute
Hello Ne,

You need to be more specific in how we can help you. My first piece of advice would be to use a dictionary. If you have difficulty with a specific sentence, let us know.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hello Barbara

Yes, you are right!

Can you help me with one sentece?

I need to ask to a company when they can send my material and say to company that I just made they payment .

Thanks

Ne
Do you mean this?

I have just made the payment for my order of [whatever it is]. Can you please let me know when I should expect to receive it?
Hi Barbara

I need to ask to foreing company whren they can shipper my material and say I just made the payment.

I would like to know also how I can to start and the end the e-mail with formal words.

Thanks for Help

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Hi Barbara

What you think about this sentences:

We have just made the payment for my pro-forma n°4040.

I am waiting the bank send me the shift so i send a copy to you.

Can you please let me know when I shoud expect to shipper it?

Thanks

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