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My company is going into new countries, everybody in the administration is taking an English course. During this course one teacher claimed that you should never, never use the greeting “Best regards”. Instead you should use “Yours sincerely” or “Kind regards”.

Well, when I went to business School in 1979 I only learned that you should only use the phrase "Yours faithfully,".

Reading this very long thread I think that one should conclude that if you know the person, you can use "Yours sincerely", and if you do not know the person, you should use "Yours faithfully".

Is this correct?

Someone wrote that you might capitalize the first letter in both words. What is the significance of that and what would it mean?

Yours faithfully,

Benny Bubel

More: Yours sincerely or Sincerely yours

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Comments  (Page 6) 
Not much for the social graces, I see, Anon. Good luck in your business career.
Hi there ,

I have a question related to this subject I f I may to ask .. I work for a school , and I was in charge to write an invitation card for mothers to come over , but I should do this in behalf of children .

Dear Mom,

so and so

Sincerely yours,

Your child .

I meant to be generalized so I didn't write the name of each child . I left it "Your child" so it is applicable for all mothers and save the hassle to write the name of more than 300 kids . And I will be able to have on card to be photocopied rather than have 300 cards to be printed with excat name of each child on the card .

My supervisor objected saying that it is a wrong and invalid to do so, If I want to use "sincerely your" I have to write the excat name for each child , and it is wrong to write "Yoru child" at the end .

What do you think ? please feed me back Emotion: smile
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 Mister Micawber's reply was promoted to an answer.
Hi there ,

I have a question related to this subject If I may to ask .. I work for a school , and I was in charge to write an invitation card for mothers to come over , but I should do this in behalf of children .

Dear Mom,

so and so

Sincerely yours,

Your child .

I meant to be generalized so I didn't write the name of each child . I left it "Your child" so it is applicable for all mothers and save the hassle to write the name of more than 300 kids . And I will be able to have on card to be photocopied rather than have 300 cards to be printed with exact name of each child on the card .

My supervisor objected saying that it is totally wrong and invalid to do so, If I want to use "sincerely your" I have to write the exact name for each child , and it is wrong to write "Your child" at the end . Is there any "Sincerely yours"'s rule limitting me to use this experession only when I declare the excat name of the sender ?

What do you think ? please feed me back Emotion: smile
I just answered your Anonymous post on this same thread, Haifaa.
Try out our live chat room.
I'm assuming you have all the names in an M$ excel sheet somewhere?

If you do, and have the ability to use M$ Access(as well as some knowledge on how to use it) you could easily create personalized cards
AnonymousHi there ,

I have a question related to this subject I f I may to ask .. I work for a school , and I was in charge to write an invitation card for mothers to come over , but I should do this in behalf of children .

Dear Mom,

so and so

Sincerely yours,

Your child .

I meant to be generalized so I didn't write the name of each child . I left it "Your child" so it is applicable for all mothers and save the hassle to write the name of more than 300 kids . And I will be able to have on card to be photocopied rather than have 300 cards to be printed with excat name of each child on the card .

My supervisor objected saying that it is a wrong and invalid to do so, If I want to use "sincerely your" I have to write the excat name for each child , and it is wrong to write "Yoru child" at the end .

What do you think ? please feed me back Emotion: smile

To the subject of Regards, etc... I've been noticing that a few people around my office are using 'Best Regards' or just 'Regards' in their signatures. I personally just have 'Thank You' in mine, since the majority of the time I'm emailing someone I'm asking them for help or information. I find the regards/best regards to almost sound hollow and phony. The majority of the emails sent are to people you don't know personally, and most likely never will go beyond those emails. In a more formal AND personal environment I could see the use of them....but as it is I just find them unnecessary formalities for my job.
"Best Regards"...sorry, but no one really uses "yours faithfully" anymore.
They do in the UK.

MrP
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
hi there,

could you please tell me, whether "Love and kisses" at the end of an email from a man to his female acquaintance does suggest any romantic attitude towards her, or it is just a friendly phrase?

thank you!
adam
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