+0

Hi teachers. Will you please correct or improve this if necessary? (I apologize for the topic)

Which of blights, poisons, pollutes or a fourth option is best to use in the context?

Guy 1 - What's happening?

Guy 2 - Burt has *** himself and passed out. Are you carrying him outside before he blights/poisons/pollutes the whole bar and they're gonna have to evacuate?

Guy 1 - Why do I have to carry him?

Guy 2 - Because you're bigger than me.

+0
anonymousAre you carrying him outside before he blights/poisons/pollutes the whole bar and they're gonna have to evacuate?

None of your choices are wrong, but I'd say "pollutes" or "contaminates".

On another topic, I think a question is wrong here because you have Guy 1 answering this question with another question. Guy 2 should say something like "You should carry him outside ...", or if it's a question, it should be "Aren't you going to carry him outside ...".

CJ

Comments  
anonymousBurt has *** himself

Can't I even write that without you bleeping it out? It's actually relevant to the question.

Anyway it's number two.

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
anonymousCan't I even write that without you bleeping it out?

It's not any or us personally who bleeps things out. It's a system-wide list of words that cause the substitution of *** whenever anyone posts a word that's on the list.

Anyway, we know what the word is in this case, so there was no need to explain it. Emotion: smile

CJ

OK. Thanks. I'll leave you out of it next time I get annoyed then. Can you help me with my questions?

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
CalifJimor if it's a question, it should be "Aren't you going to carry him outside ...".

Can I also just say "Are you going to carry him outside ...?"?

anonymous
CalifJimor if it's a question, it should be "Aren't you going to carry him outside ...".

Can I also just say "Are you going to carry him outside ...?"?

No. It's too neutral. You have to get across the idea that you want him to "carry him outside". That's what the negative interrogative does.

CJ