A friend, who has taken a screen writing course, but never written a screen play has said that my dialog is too blocky. I know what this means. But I do not have a standard to measure against. At what point does dialog become too blocky?
Can someone please refer me to a published screen play that may be considered too blocky by current standards? Also can some one refer me to one that would be a good contrast? Please refer to websites where the screen plays are available.

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"These are the times that try men's souls." Tom Paine

Marc
I don't even know what "too blocky" means..
But if your friend's comment has to do with long patches with only one person speaking, that's not dialogue... it's a speech. You know, like the speech in Hamlet.
In real life, nobody's going to let you say more than maybe two sentences without interjececting something. DIalogue means at least two people are involved in the conversation... and CONVERSE means they don't agree. Good dialogue is a battle - it may be a quiet battle played out with perfect manners and no raised voices, but each person is still fighting for something.
It used to be that there was a "five line rule" - that anytime a character spoke for more than five lines on the page (not 5 sentences) you were in speech country and that speech had better be as good as the Christopher Walken watch speech in PULP FICTION.. But I was on a panel a couple of years ago and two different development execs said it's down to 3 lines, now! Yikes!
Anyway, make sure dialogue is dialogue.
If your friend meant something else by "blocky", then it's some other answer.
- Bill
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A friend, who has taken a screen writing course, but never written a screen play has said that my dialog ... refer me to one that would be a good contrast? Please refer to websites where the screen plays are available.

Step up to the plate. Put up a small sample of your writing.

What's a little evisceration between friends?
Seriously, if there's a problem, it'll get found-out right quick hear. I guarantee it.

Paulo Joe Jingy
It's just a little chewing. Most of us have too much ass anyway.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I don't even know what "too blocky" means.. But if your friend's comment has to do with long patches with ... a panel a couple of years ago and two different development execs said it's down to 3 lines, now! Yikes!

Yikes was also my reaction. Obviously these people don't deal with Italians. I've posted one of my scenes on my website at

www.rsgnet.net/amfol.htm
would some of you please take a look at it and see if the Gino is overkill? This is a first draft and there are formatting and other issues right now which I clean up on rewrite, but you have me concerned about this speech thing.
Raymond
That is what he meant. There is an actual speech, a sermon by a priest. It is less than a page. But much scenes of the dialog in several is between a king and his guard. 4-5 lines for the king, a word to a couple of lines response for the retainer. Until the end of the scene where the retainer makes a long, 4-6 lines, response.
I can break it up, but considering the difference in status of the two charachters I am afraid it will seem too casual.

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"These are the times that try men's souls." Tom Paine

Marc
I would be quite eager to do that. I can handle a great deal of evisceration, even disembowelment. But I am writing about a true historical event, and the best story I have ever heard. I don't want to give somebody who is a faster more experienced writer any ideas. Maybe I can change the names of the characters and leave out and historical references.

~~
"These are the times that try men's souls." Tom Paine

Marc
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