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Hi, everyone.

Should I use "the" or "a" before axe in the sentence below?

Do not take the tick tock of the clock for granted. As they are blows of an/the axe to your life's tree.

Thanks!

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This is a case where you can use either article, as you prefer.

It is not correct to start a new sentence here at "As" (unless you deliberately want a very staccato style, which to me does not read well in this case.)

"they" (plural) does not agree with "tick-tock" (singular).

I would hyphenate "tick-tock".

Comments  
silak12Should I use "the" or "a" before axe in the sentence below?

It is not a sentence. It is a sentence and a sentence fragment.

"Do not take the tick-tocks of the clock for granted, as they are the blows of an axe to your life's tree."

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 GPY's reply was promoted to an answer.

Do not take the tick-tock of the clock for granted; it is the blow of an axe to your life's tree.

What do you think about this one?

silak12Do not take the tick-tock of the clock for granted; it is the blow of an axe to your life's tree.

But this loses the sense that each tick is a blow, which, for me, seems as if it should be the main idea. I think something like this would be better:

Do not take the tick-tocks of the clock for granted, as they are like blows of an axe to your life's tree.

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GPYDo not take the tick-tocks of the clock for granted, as they are like blows of an axe to your life's tree.

Thanks ever so much.

Is it necessary to use "like" in this sentence?

Can I say: Do not take the tick-tocks of the clock for granted, as they are blows of an axe to your life's tree.?

silak12Can I say: Do not take the tick-tocks of the clock for granted, as they are blows of an axe to your life's tree.?

Yes, you can use it as a metaphor like this if you wish, though personally I prefer the version with "like".