+0
Does anyone know how this expression developed? Where does it come from?
+0
Two dogs fighting over a bone, I always thought.

Yep: 'This expression alludes to two dogs fighting (contending) over a single bone. In slightly different guise, bone of dissension, it was used figuratively in the 16th century and took its present form in the early 1700s.'
Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thanks MrM.

Speaking of a bone, I shouldn't expect another explanation, but still I thought it could be something more behind the expression.

Its equivalent in Spanish, the apple of the contention, has a mythological origin, with a complicated story which, in short, refers to the three most beautiful Greek goddesses, Hera, Athene and Aphrodite in content for a made on gold apple with the inscription 'for the most beautiful', thrown by Erida, the goddess of the discord.
I know the myth, and the phrase certainly exists in English; but it has not the general acceptance that the good old 'bone' has. Literary and classical allusions are phenomena fading from the language.
Mister MicawberI know the myth, and the phrase certainly exists in English; but it has not the general acceptance that the good old 'bone' has. Literary and classical allusions are phenomena fading from the language.
I once heard that "The Bone of Contention" related to voodoo. A Witch Doctor's curse whereby the  cursed victim so strongly believed he would die as a result of same. This belief  preyed on the victim's mind so obsessively that he actually died due to auto suggestion.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Very impressive Mr Micawber. I always thought of you in a flea bittin cheap suit freezing in the rain trying to stay out of the poor house.