My daughter, who is growing up in Australia and has to be reminded fairly frequently to aspirate an 'h' when she spells out a word containing one so my ears don't hurt, will say that she is "bored of" something. After I irritate her by pointing out that only boring people get bored I also tell her that I say "bored with", to which she shrugs and tells me that everyone she knows says it the same way she does.
I'm sure she's right but I'm curious as to where the difference comes from. I don't recall ever hearing "bored of" when growing up in New Zealand. Am I in the minority?
1 2 3 4 5
Maybe the grammatical structure is:
Bored of (something) > bored of eating Cod (of requires use of verbs)

Bored with (someone) > bored with Stalin's speeches (with does not always require verbs)
I don't believe there should be any great variation of usage between: US, UK, NZ, AU, Canada.
Maybe the grammatical structure is: Bored of (something) > bored of eating Cod (of requires use of verbs) Bored with ... always require verbs) I don't believe there should be any great variation of usage between: US, UK, NZ, AU, Canada.

My daughter, who is growing up in Australia and has ... growing up in New Zealand. Am I in the minority?

It's tired of and bored with. Obviously people are letting one expression influence the other.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Maybe the grammatical structure is: Bored of (something) > bored ... great variation of usage between: US, UK, NZ, AU, Canada.

It's tired of and bored with. Obviously people are letting one expression influence the other.

I've certainly never hear 'bored of' in N.Z. where I live.
Rose Bryburn schrieb:
My daughter, who is growing up in Australia and has to be reminded fairly frequently to aspirate an 'h' when ... comes from. I don't recall ever hearing "bored of" when growing up in New Zealand. Am I in the minority?

According to Language Log (1), you are in the majority, but she's following a major trend.
Cheers
Michael
(1) http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/000636.html
It's silly talking about how many years we will have to spend in the jungles of Vietnam when we could pave the whole country and put parking stripes on it and still be home by Christmas. Ronald Reagan, October 10, 1965
My daughter, who is growing up in Australia and has to be reminded fairly frequently to aspirate an 'h' when ... comes from. I don't recall ever hearing "bored of" when growing up in New Zealand. Am I in the minority?

Actually "of" is the more appropriate, if you think about it.

If you are reacting to the idea of something, positively or negatively, you can say that you are XXX'd with it. However, if you are describing the effect on you of having indulged in something, you are XXX'd of it.

Matti
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
It's tired of and bored with. Obviously people are letting one expression influence the other.

I've certainly never hear 'bored of' in N.Z. where I live.

I don't think I've heard it from adults in Australia, but I have heard kids and teenagers say it. I don't know whether they are picking it up from TV or just from each other. It seems to have appeared in about the last 5-10 years.

Regards
John
for mail: my initials plus those of alt.usage.english at tpg dot com dot au
My daughter, who is growing up in Australia and has to be reminded fairly frequently to aspirate an 'h' when ... "bored with", to which she shrugs and tells me that everyone she knows says it the same way she does.

There is a danger that she will become bored by your corrections.

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.e.u)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more