+0
I am still confused as to how one would use born/borne.

For example, which of the following would be correct:

In an essay on the state of scholarship about Arab American literature following 9/11, one critic would write of the fundamental inadequacies of a critical framework born of political crisis.

OR

In an essay on the state of scholarship about Arab American literature following 9/11, one critic would write of the fundamental inadequacies of a critical framework borne of political crisis.

Cheers
+0
"born" is used as a past participle of "bear" in passive constructions where "bear" has the sense of "give birth to", either literally or figuratively. Your sentence falls into this category (political crisis having figuratively "given birth to" the framework), so it should be "born".

For other meanings of "bear", such as "carry"/"support", the past participle is "borne". E.g.: "a burden borne by us all".
Comments  
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
According to the American Heritage Dictionary, 'borne' is the past participle of to bear (when "bear" has the sense of "give birth to") in active voice and in passive costructions followed by "by."

This is where the confusion lies, I think.
English 1b3According to the American Heritage Dictionary, 'borne' is the past participle of to bear (when "bear" has the sense of "give birth to") in active voice and in passive costructions followed by "by."
Oops, yes, you're right: "He was borne by a woman of Jewish origin".

Edit: Just to be clear, by "oops", I mean this is another special case I didn't think of, not that I changed my mind about the original.
Unfortunately, few know or think of this, so the wrong form of the verb is used regularly, making the problem worse and harder for learners, especially those unfamiliar with the difference between the past participle and the past simple tense.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.