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<Boss tells an employee> You haven't turned in your quickie for this week.

Is the above natural?
Thanks.
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Comments  
Hi,

I have no idea what this means. What's the context?

The word 'quickie' often has a sexual meaning.

Clive
I was told it meant a brief report but I feel the same way that it's quite kinky.

Welcome back, Clive! How was your vacation? You didn't go to Bali, did you? remember?
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quick·ie
: something done or made in a hurry: as a (1) : a hurriedly and cheaply produced motion picture or play (2) : a book or other publication hurriedly written and published b : a hurriedly planned and executed program (as of studies) c : a hurried trip or other activity d : a sudden often unauthorized brief strike of workers e : QUICK ONE


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Actually, I already looked it up in a dictionary and got about the same definitions. However, it may not fit the context which I provided, which is why I asked ...for naturalness.
Hi N2G,
It was great, thank you. No, I stayed in Ontario.
Clive
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I think any native speaker (at least in America) is going to interpret quickie as a brief sexual act. Only if there's a clear progression of context can it be used and understood without the sexual connotation.

For instance, somebody might refer to something as having been a quickie (break, nap, task, etc) but even still there's the underlying reference to the sexual definition.

I don't believe I've ever heard or used the term without it referring to the sexual act.

Perhaps this is just another one of those differences in regional usage?

I'll always remember the time our new office clerk (who happened to be British) asked our boss (quite loudly, in the main room, where everybody could hear) if he had anymore 'rubbers' because his old one was broken. She couldn't understand why the entire staff burst out laughing, until the red-faced boss final stammered out "I think you mean eraser".

I had the same reaction when I read N2G's original sentence.
HHAHHA... Thanks for the joke, Skrej. I think you've confirmed my suspicion that the original sentence isn't natural.
It's true, the first connotation is sexual. But one is supposed to keep his cool ... and think of the others ...
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