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Hi,

"Both Tom's and Jimmy's lawyer's statements were part of the printed interview."

Should it be 'statements' or 'statement'? There are two of them, but I don't want to make it seem like Jimmy's lawyer made two statements.

I'd probably go for 'statements'.

Thank you. Emotion: smile

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Ann225I'd probably go for 'statements'.

So would I. (Therefore, it's a good choice. Emotion: smile )

CJ

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Ann225Both Tom's and Jimmy's lawyer's statements

On rethinking this, it says both Tom and Jimmy had a lawyer. That's more than one lawyer, so it should be

Tom's and Jimmy's lawyers' statements

CJ

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Comments  
Ann225

but I don't want to make it seem like Jimmy's lawyer made two statements.

Then only one statement?

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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anonymousThen only one statement?

The expression is inherently ambiguous, so if it's important to be precise, you have to spell it out in detail.

Tom's lawyer's statement and Jimmy's lawyer's statement
OR
Tom and Jimmy's lawyer's statement
OR
Tom's lawyer's statement and Jimmy's lawyer's statements
OR
Tom's lawyer's statements and Jimmy's lawyer's statement
OR
Tom and Jimmy's lawyer's statement
OR
Tom and Jimmy's lawyer's statements
OR
...

CJ

Should I go for the plural then to avoid further confusion? There was, after all, more than one lawyer.
Ann225 Should I go for the plural then to avoid further confusion? There was, after all, more than one lawyer.

I think the following is sufficient.

Tom's and Jimmy's lawyers' statements

CJ

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