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Hi guys

I am writing an article to be published (very exciting, and my first!), so I am being very careful doing everything correct. When I write momentum-space in the title, then should it be

1) "Momentum-Space"

or

2) "Momentum-space"?

I don't know what the general rules are for this. I hope you can shed some light on my issue.

Best,
Jim.
Comments  
Not sure, if nothing else helps you should consider capitalizing the whole title thus avoiding the problem altogether.
Thanks. I'll try to see if I can do that, if nothing else helps.

Does anybody else have an opinion about this? Also, what is the proper english term for the information consisting of birth-date social security number? I know it sounds odd, but I have to write that too on the article, and I was wondering what that information is called in english. I thought perhaps "credentials"?

Best,
Jim.
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Hi,

Does anybody else have an opinion about this?

It would help if you told us the complete title.

Also, what is the proper english term for the information consisting of birth-date social security number? There's no real specific term for those two together. You might speak of it in terms of how you intend to ue it. eg 'identifying information'.

I know it sounds odd, but I have to write that too on the article, and I was wondering what that information is called in english. I thought perhaps "credentials"? No. This word relates to the idea of 'belief'. Your credentials focus on why I should trust you, why I should believe in your skill.

eg His credentials as an English teacher include a PH D in English linguistics.

Best wishes, Clive

The complete title is

"A Momentum-(S/s)pace Approach to Vortices in Higgs Models".

Regarding the birth-date and social-security number, I have to write something like
"Information: 01.13.1983 - <social security number>". But in this context, "information" seems not to be the optimal word to use.
Hi,

The complete title is

"A Momentum-Space Approach to Vortices in Higgs Models".

"A Momentum-space Approach to Vortices in Higgs Models".

Either way is fine. I prefer #1 because it seems to give each of the two concepts equal importance. But I'm just a layman.

Regarding the birth-date and social-security number, I have to write something like

"Information: 01.13.1983 - <social security number>". But in this context, "information" seems not to be the optimal word to use. As I said, you might speak of it in terms of how you intend to use it. You haven't told us that.

( Where I live, for privacy and legal reasons we avoid using a person's social security number except for the government-related purposes it is intended for. )

Clive
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Thanks, I prefer #1 too, but I had to made sure it was correct.

It is just mandatory information to include on the article when it is being reviewed, so the reviewer(s) can verify the author. And instead of writing a long sentence with "This is my .....", I thought I'd use one word for it. I am not sure if that answers your question?

I like "identifying information", if there is no better word.

Sincerely,
Jim.