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It is a characteristic of reduced clauses, both adverbial and relative, to be non-finite.

This is equal in meaning to this, correct?

It is a characteristic of both adverbial and relative reduced clauses to be non-finite.

How does the phrase in bold work, because it can't be an appositive adjective where 'which is' is omitted, since the meaning would be incorrect:

'...of reduced clauses, which are both adverbial and relative, to...'

When does both x & y apply to the preceding noun together?

Thanks
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Yes, and it is still a compound appositive adjective. I am not familiar with any 'which is' rule; where did you find it?
Mister MicawberYes, and it is still a compound appositive adjective. I am not familiar with any 'which is' rule; where did you find it?


I read somewhere that an appositive is simply a relative clause without the relative pronoun and the verb to be. This makes sense in all cases, excluding this construction.

If it is an appositive, then how does it work? What part of speech is 'both'? Conjunction?

Usually both adjetctives in an adjective phrase describe the preceding noun together; that is, the house is old and crusty.

I looked at the house, (which was) both old and crusty.

In the sentence at hand, however, both adjectives describe the preceding noun separately; that is, reduced clauses are adverbial or they are relative. Why is it that both adjectives within the phrase describe the noun individually?

It is a characteristic of reduced clauses, both adverbial and relative, to be non-finite.
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'Both...and' is a correlative conjunction. I see nothing wrong with the following extensions, beyond its awkwardness:

It is a characteristic of reduced clauses, (which are) both adverbial and relative, to be non-finite.
Mister Micawber'Both...and' is a correlative conjunction. I see nothing wrong with the following extensions, beyond its awkwardness:

It is a characteristic of reduced clauses, (which are) both adverbial and relative, to be non-finite.

Can you not see the ambiguity? Reduced clauses can't be an adverbial and a relative. It can be one or the other.

Sorry, but I see no ambiguity in the original sentence; thrusting 'which are' into it does not helo, I admit.
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I think I haven't made my question clear. Perhaps we are both stuck on different tracks, unable to get off. I'll post the question again and see what happens. Cheers