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Hi teachers,

1. With your heads still bowed / bowing, I want you [...]

Is this one of those transitive verb forms?

2. From dictionary: People bowing their heads in prayer. What is the verb here, are bowing?

Thanks

TN

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tinanam0102transitive verb

"bow" can be intransitive (The violinist bowed at the end of his performance), and it can be transitive (She bowed her head).

As you know, the transitive form can be made passive (Her head was bowed).

tinanam0102With your heads still bowed / bowing

bowed is the more usual choice, but bowing has the same meaning here.

tinanam0102 From dictionary: People bowing their heads in prayer.

This is not a sentence. It's a fragment. A noun phrase. It can be said as shown in the dictionary or as People with their heads bowed/bowing in prayer.

tinanam0102What is the verb here, are bowing?

Well, as you see, there is no auxiliary 'are' in that fragment, but you can make a full sentence of it like this: The people are bowing their heads in prayer.

CJ

Comments  

Hi

That's a good question. If I am in meditation, my head is bowed. If I am showing respect towards someone, my head will be bowing. There is a difference there - the verb is used in a different way

Dave

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

Hi CalifJim,

Let's say you walk into a church, and people are praying with their eyes closed. Would you say:

1. I 'm seeing the people praying with their heads bowed. Now their heads are bowed. [The state of their heads.]

2. The people are bowing their heads praying. [They have already bowed their heads before you entered the church.]

Thanks

TN

tinanam0102Let's say you walk into a church, and people are praying with their eyes closed.

with their eyes closed is different from with their heads bowed. I don't think the part about closed eyes is really relevant to your question.

tinanam0102Would you say:
1. I 'm seeing the people praying with their heads bowed. Now their heads are bowed. [The state of their heads.]
2. The people are bowing their heads praying. [They have already bowed their heads before you entered the church.]

I'd be more likely to say sentence 1.

I don't see it as important whether they have already bowed their heads before I entered the church. 2. means the same thing whether they have already bowed their heads or not.

CJ

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Hi CalifJim,

I'm sorry I expressed it wrong. Let's say you walk into a church, and people are praying with heads bowed and their eyes closed.

1. Would you say, they're bowing their heads in prayer?

2. The class has started, does it mean the class is starting?

Thanks

TN

tinanam0102 Let's say you walk into a church, and people are praying with heads bowed and their eyes closed. 1. Would you say, they're bowing their heads in prayer?

Yes, that's fine.

tinanam01022. The class has started, does it mean the class is starting?

No. Those are on opposite side of "now".

has started happened before now.
is starting is happening now or quite soon.

X = NOW

.... has started ................X .............................
........................................... X is starting ........

CJ

Hi CalifJim,

Thanks for answering my questions. I think I taught the opposite to the little one.

When I looked at the my topic list on weekend, it didn't show update, so I thought it didn't get answered.

Thank you so much

TN

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