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Hi,

In Hong Kong, lots of Chinese people at the office use "Box files" to refer to "Ring-binders". I don't think "Box files" are correct English. However, it is so widely used that when I say ring-binders, people will question me if I'm talking about "box-files". Could anyone help me with this?

And, when we talk about an overseas office, say, in Japan, should we say:-

1. the Japan Office (with the definite article "the"), or

2. Japan Office, or

3. Japan's Office

Thanks a lot.

Kathy
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To me (in the UK), this is a box file:

And this is a ring-binder

Normally you should say "the Japan office" or "the Japanese office".

Edit: I cannot get the pictures to display properly. They appear fine in the edit window but disappear in the actual post. The pictures are here.

Comments  
Hi. Just a note. Ring binder is also called "Files" in Britain sometimes.
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 Mr Wordy's reply was promoted to an answer.
Hi Mr Wordy,

Thanks for your prompt reply & your pictures. They're very helpful to me.

By the way, I'd like clarify one thing. So, is it true to say that a box file is different from a ring-binder and the two terms are not interchangeable because they're actually different kinds of statiionery as shown in the pictures?

Thanks.

Kathy
I would think so from the AmE point of view, Kathy. You might find a ring binder inside a box file, though.
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Hi Mister Micawber,

Thanks a lot for your clarification!

Kathy
Kathy456So, is it true to say that a box file is different from a ring-binder and the two terms are not interchangeable because they're actually different kinds of statiionery as shown in the pictures?
Yes, to me also they are different things.
Hi Mr Wordy,

Thanks a lot for your clarification!

Kathy
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